The Print Edition Of The Inquirer On its Way Out!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by JimofPennsylvan, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. JimofPennsylvan

    JimofPennsylvan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    The Philadelphia Inquirer just announced that it was raising its newsstand price from $1.50 to $2.00. This is a disgrace, newspapers are vital to a strong and good community they play an irreplaceable role in educating and persuading for the good the citizenry of a community. Just last year in May of 2016 the Philadelphia Inquirer raised its price from $1.00 to $1.50 that was a poor stewardship decision it should have been raised to only a $1.25 which would have been in keeping with the inflation rate since it was previously raised. But this raise to $2.00 is completely indefensible from a good management standpoint. The reality of what the management is doing is they are trying to bring about the ending of the print edition of the newspaper and that would be a tragedy and a significant harming of the community for the reader can more quickly and broadly garnish and better comprehend information from a print edition compared to an internet edition of a newspaper. Today a subscription to a print edition cost about $1.00 per day for the daily paper so when newsstand circulation dramatically drops off like it should because of the new very high price the Inquirer management will be forced to turn to the subscriber reader and significantly raise their price which will kill off the circulation business which will force the management's hand in so far as cutting costs which don't pay for themselves so that they will end the print edition. The publisher, Terrence Egger, and Chairman, Josh Kopelman, are not quality managers by any stretch of the imagination they are steering the Inquirer to its demise. The person, Gerry Lenfest, that saved the Inquirer from just being a tool for a major power broker in the region is a wonderful person with a great heart but he made a colossal mistake in donating the newspaper to the Institute for Journalism in New Media, a non-profit, which are basically lead by a bunch of elites that want to bring about the end of print newspapers. Gerry Lenfest, still has the stature and the influence to save the newspapers for the community by using his influence to force the sale of the papers to a big newspaper company that won't get involved in the editorial aspect of the newspaper but will just run it like a business that is concerned about its long-term well being of the papers. There still is time to save the print editions of the Inquirer and the Daily News but the door is closing fast, is there any leaders in our community that really care about this very important issue!
     
    Nytecat and vampyre927 like this.
  2. OakmontGuy

    OakmontGuy NE Philadelphia Proud!

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    144
    Will they be charging more to publish articles with separate paragraphs?
     
    Nytecat and vampyre927 like this.
  3. Nytecat

    Nytecat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    139
    It's a dick move but what can we do about it? Nobody is going to pay those kinds of prices for watered down, second rate journalism. They seem hellbent on becoming the first daily big city paper to phase out hard copies.
     
    fiveomar likes this.
  4. MackeyDingo

    MackeyDingo REALLY Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    589
    Likes Received:
    203
    Two things, they are raising the price and you are jumping to the conclusion that it is to phase out the print edition. I don't see anything other than the cost increase supporting that conclusion. Seems like its just a guess based on what you feel the paper is worth or what people are willing to pay. Am I wrong? Also, would a delivery subscription cost less? It frequently does. What is the delivery subscription increase?

    Next, the quote above. I'm not sure what youre basing this on. I doubt it is as universal it you have written it. Just one example, I can read the digital version of the paper anywhere in the world, everyday. It would be difficult for me to garnish information from the print edition when I am not in possession of today's copy.

    Otherwise, I agree, that's a lot for what the paper has become. Its very thin. Though under the latest management it has become better.
     
  5. Jayfar

    Jayfar Junior Old Fart

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,637
    Likes Received:
    639
    Heck, the Inquirer Washington Bureau hardly exists these days - just one reporter, Jonathan Tamari - with most DC coverage now provided by the Washington Post, AP and a little Reuters.
     
  6. Outlaw Star

    Outlaw Star Teen Heartthrob

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    34
    Don't blame the Inquirer, blame a populace that wants up-to-minute news coverage online, but without having to pay for it. That's the reality of journalism today; the traditional paper business model has been replaced with a digital one that's virtually impossible to make a good profit on. Digital advertising is a poor replacement for the classifieds of old, and most people balk at having to pay online subscriptions or have news content hidden behind a paywall.

    The sad fact is, your so-called door has already closed. Print media is largely dead, since our consumption habits--particularly for news--have largely moved online. There's no putting this genie back in the bottle. The Inky could give away print papers for free and it still wouldn't make a difference. I take no pleasure in saying this, since even as older millennial I love print, but there's just no coming back from the digital revolution.
     
  7. MackeyDingo

    MackeyDingo REALLY Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    589
    Likes Received:
    203
    In my opinion, the home delivery subscription is far superior to any other format. There is still something about paging through the physical copy (either a book or a paper) that provides a richer experience than the digital version even from a tablet.
    That said, it isn't better in all ways, the digital subscription is more convenient in that it can be read anywhere.

    Of course, I am describing different types of subscriptions. And people want everything for free (studies show that people even want potholes fixed without paying taxes for it), so.... here we are.
     

Share This Page