Philly DA Office is a Hot Mess

Discussion in 'Local and State' started by Jayfar, Jan 26, 2016.

  1. vamprye927

    vamprye927 Member

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    Not really suprised...Krasner has been a mean, vindictive kind of man!! He sent me a "nasty E-mail, voicemail" because I wouldn't give money to his campaign.
     
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  2. Hospitalitygirl

    Hospitalitygirl Resident Ornery Bitch

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    Insider baseball, but he really showed his petty, vindictive, side here.
     
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  3. fiveomar

    fiveomar Well-Known Member

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    One of the most worrisome things about this sudden firing of staff is that the cases they were working on are in jeopardy. With no transition period to whoever the new prosecutors on the cases are, expect a large percentage of criminals in these cases to walk free.
     
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  4. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    I'm very apprehensive about this new DA administration.
     
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  5. Templeton

    Templeton Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry he's just draining the swamp. Maybe this will endear him to Trump voters?
     
  6. fiveomar

    fiveomar Well-Known Member

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    Called it: Krasner firings stir fallout in court: Cases stalled, criticism emerges

    Just three days after new District Attorney Larry Krasner fired 31 people in a dramatic office shakeup, the impact began to ripple through Philadelphia’s court system on Monday.

    One judge took the bench and criticized the prosecutor’s office for asking to postpone a murder trial because the assistant district attorney handling the case was among those handed a pink slip.

    “This court has been placed, because of the management decisions by the new district attorney, in an exceedingly difficult position today,” said Common Pleas Judge Barbara A. McDermott.

    In a different courtroom, another judge agreed to delay a vehicular homicide trial because the prosecutor on that case had also been forced out. Lawyers were asked to return Tuesday to figure out the next step. The judge, meanwhile, ordered the defendant’s house arrest lifted immediately — saying that to maintain the restriction because of staffing issues in the prosecutor’s office was “not fair.”

    And a supervisor in the district attorney’s office acknowledged it was “scrambling” to adjust to the changes.

    The developments at the Criminal Justice Center marked the latest aftershocks from Krasner’s striking staffing announcement Friday. A career defense attorney until he was sworn in as district attorney earlier this month, Krasner had vowed to make sweeping changes to the office, which he criticized as “off the rails” during his campaign.

    And while it was not clear whether the fallout from the firings would last for days or weeks, Krasner signaled Monday that he was continuing to reorganize the office. He announced the appointment of a new victims services supervisor, Movita Johnson-Harrell, a Philadelphia-based anti-violence activist, calling her a “crucial” link between his office and victims and witnesses.

    Still, the new district attorney has yet to personally comment on last week’s forced resignations, or explain why certain prosecutors were asked to leave.

    And that did not sit well with the relatives of Marquan Royster, who came to court Monday for the scheduled trial of his alleged killer, Ameer Murphy, and instead learned it would be delayed.

    “It makes it very hard to move on and grieve properly,” said one family member, who asked not to be identified criticizing the prosecutor’s office. “It’s like we’re basically starting from scratch again.”

    The delay was necessary because Krasner had ousted Andrew Notaristefano, the assistant district attorney who had been handling the case. On Monday, Notaristefano sat in the back of the courtroom — to support the victim’s family.

    McDermott, the judge, was critical of the impact of his firing, though she acknowledged Krasner had the right to fire him. Still, she said the district attorney’s office exhibited “bad management” by scrambling to find replacements for Notaristefano just days ahead of jury selection, and that the last-minute request to delay the trial was “devastating” for both families.

    McDermott agreed to postpone the prosecution until April, but she apologized to the packed courtroom, saying the decision brought her “dissatisfaction and unhappiness.”

    At one point, with her frustration over several unrelated cases bubbling, she summoned Brian Zarallo — chief of the district attorney’s homicide unit — to her courtroom. Zarallo told the judge he was “scrambling” to make necessary adjustments given the sudden reduction in his staff.

    “Figuring out the fallout is an ongoing process,” he said.

    Royster’s supporters said Johnson-Harrell, the new victims coordinator, stopped into the courtroom with Krasner Monday and talked to them — but that Krasner did not personally address them. They left the courtroom upset, saying the entire process left them feeling “re-victimized.”

    On a different floor, another judge — Glenn Bronson — had to reschedule a vehicular homicide trial because the assigned prosecutor, Thomas Lipscomb, was also a casualty of Krasner’s reorganization.

    Bronson was not as explicit as McDermott in his reaction to the firings, but acknowledged it in agreeing to postpone the proceeding.

    “It was extraordinary circumstances,” the judge said.
     
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  7. Tartan69

    Tartan69 Pawn in game of life

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    This is such a clear example of the system failing the victims of crime that it provides a certain amount of justification for the reasoning on why people sometimes take the law into their own hands.
     
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  8. ShoshTrvls

    ShoshTrvls Well-Known Member

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    Do you all know how often cases are continued (delayed)? Dozens, on a daily basis. All you need to do is sit in a criminal courtroom for an hour to see it happening. It's a problem with the system and exists independent of these firings. And if there's a need to clean house (and I take no position on that, but it certainly seems that at least some of the firings were on solid footing), there's simply no other way to do it.
     
  9. fiveomar

    fiveomar Well-Known Member

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    There was no transition period for the old prosecutors to transfer knowledge to other staff/the new prosecutors on these cases, they were just suddenly fired with zero transition plan or even new prosecutors assigned. With that, the cases become very weak and some of these criminals may end up going free for horrific acts. That's the main issue.

    But there's no point trying to convince a partisan blinded by their party loyalty. Joe Khan (Democrat) would have made for a much better DA.
     
    #189 fiveomar, Jan 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
  10. ShoshTrvls

    ShoshTrvls Well-Known Member

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    An employer simply cannot keep 30 terminated employees working for "transition" purposes. Especially where there is highly confidential information involved, you can't allow terminated employees to continue to have access to computer systems and files (not to mention the morale/disruption inherent in those employees remaining vs. a "clean break").

    And I'm not coming at this from a partisan view, as it would little matter to me if those DAs continued on the job for a few weeks. But I was involved in a similar situation many many years ago, and initially argued for giving those who were terminated continuing employment for a short period of time but was "outvoted" by those who belief that a clean break, even if there was some initial disruption, was best for the institution and its work, as well as for the employees. Looking back, I am certain they were right on this issue.
     
  11. Tartan69

    Tartan69 Pawn in game of life

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    This happens all the time in large businesses. There are many ways to make this happen smoothly, with both carrots and sticks.
     
  12. ShoshTrvls

    ShoshTrvls Well-Known Member

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    Those "carrots" and "sticks" are usually not available in the public sector.
     
  13. Tartan69

    Tartan69 Pawn in game of life

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    If they aren't available in employment agreements for those that are in mission-critical roles or are privy to confidential information, public or not, then that is either:

    1. a huge dereliction of duty on those that create and approve those employment agreements
    2. an even bigger dereliction of duty on those that assign mission-critical roles or provide access to confidential information

    We aren't dealing with run-of-the-mill paper pushers here.
     
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  14. O.H. Lee

    O.H. Lee Well-Known Member

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    The dead wood sure. But axing numerous career homicide prosecutors is not the same as getting rid of do nothing politicians
     
  15. O.H. Lee

    O.H. Lee Well-Known Member

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    The run of the mill minor felony cases are continued everyday. It actually is a tactic by the defense attorneys to try and get a case thrown out for lack of prosecution.

    However we are talking about major Homicide trials that were prepped and scheduled for both sides well in advance. Not good.
     
  16. ShoshTrvls

    ShoshTrvls Well-Known Member

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    I agree that delaying trials that were ready to go is "not good." But, if you accept that people elected Krasner to make some major changes (I don't want to get into a discussion, at least on this point, as to whether electing Krasner was good or bad), I also don't think there was a better option.

    (And while defense attorneys are definitely not blameless in delaying trials and hearings, I've seen more than a few resulting from (a) failing to bring down a prisoner (which means that someone in jail, who might be let out, has to stay in jail); (b) officers unavailable; (c) witnesses unavailable (and don't get me started on that topic, from all sides how the courts deal with witnesses is shameful); (d) necessary paperwork or reports not completed; and (e) prosecutors requesting the continuance.)
     
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  17. Tedk

    Tedk Bean Counter

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  18. O.H. Lee

    O.H. Lee Well-Known Member

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    Seth had the world in his pocket and he traded it for a chocolate leather couch.
     
  19. Hospitalitygirl

    Hospitalitygirl Resident Ornery Bitch

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    It appears as though your apprehension is well-founded. This is only going to get worse.
     
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  20. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    I'm more than apprehensive now.
     
  21. Burholme06

    Burholme06 Well-Known Member

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  22. Hospitalitygirl

    Hospitalitygirl Resident Ornery Bitch

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    I was just perusing my inbox and noticed an update from 6ABC News. It seems last night was a particularly violent night. I counted:

    -a woman shooting an intruder in N Philly
    -a man shot 3 times on a street in Frankford, in critical condition
    -someone shot in the hip when gunfire erupted in N Philly
    -a man and a woman stabbed in N Philly

    I suspect these are only highlights of a rather busy night. Has the clock rolled back to another time and place for us as a city? It certainly feels that way. I can remember the old days of PhillyBlog and the relatively new to the city people commenting on crimes and sounds like gunfire in different neighborhoods. That finally seemed to settle down, but now, it's starting to really pick up again. Is this a harbinger of more to come?
     
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  23. Tartan69

    Tartan69 Pawn in game of life

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    [​IMG]
     
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  24. Hospitalitygirl

    Hospitalitygirl Resident Ornery Bitch

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    Yeah...I know.
     
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  25. O.H. Lee

    O.H. Lee Well-Known Member

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    Another homicide on Diamond Street in Temple’s shadow on Saturday.

    The warmer weather hasn’t arrived for good yet. It is going to be very interesting.
     
  26. Hospitalitygirl

    Hospitalitygirl Resident Ornery Bitch

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    That one is troubling.
     
  27. ShoshTrvls

    ShoshTrvls Well-Known Member

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    Actually, the answer is no. I know this doesn't fit your preordained version of the facts, but homicides are down 11% and violent crime overall is down nearly 10% this year, and property crime relatively stable (up 1%).

    Crime Stats Reports: 2018 - Google Drive
     
  28. fiveomar

    fiveomar Well-Known Member

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    Warm weather came very late this year.
     
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  29. Politburo

    Politburo Well-Known Member

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    Sure, but the data is still the data. Maybe you've heard that data>anecdotes?

    The data shows a reduction in violent crimes, which does not support the narrative of "things are getting worse" because Soros.
     
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