Massive Twitter Crackdown on Fake Accounts

Discussion in 'Global' started by Jayfar, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Jayfar

    Jayfar I'm very old®

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    Twitter is sweeping out fake accounts like never before, putting user growth at risk | Washington Post

    SAN FRANCISCO – Twitter has sharply escalated its battle against fake and suspicious accounts, suspending more than one million accounts a day in recent months, a major shift to lessen the flow of disinformation on the platform, according to data obtained by The Washington Post.

    The rate of account suspensions, which Twitter confirmed to the Post, has more than doubled since October, when the company under congressional pressure revealed how Russia used fake accounts to manipulate the U.S. presidential election. Twitter suspended more than 70 million accounts in May and June, and the pace has continued in July, according to the data.


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  2. Jayfar

    Jayfar I'm very old®

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    Also an earlier WashPo article on a recent meeting between social media companies and federal law enforcement:

    Tech didn't spot Russian interference last election, now asks for help | Washington Post

    By The Washington Post
    Posted Jun 27, 2018 at 5:00 AM

    SAN FRANCISCO — Silicon Valley companies and law enforcement are starting to talk about how to ward off meddling by malicious actors including Russia on social media in the November midterms, an attempt at dialogue and information-sharing that was absent during the 2016 presidential elections.

    Facebook quietly convened a meeting last month with representatives from the biggest players in the technology industry along with FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials who are responsible for protecting elections from foreign interference, according to eight people familiar with the discussions. Google, Twitter, Apple, Microsoft, Snap and the parent company of Yahoo and AOL, Verizon subsidiary Oath, attended, according to four of the people.


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    Silicon Valley firms have also started to talk more with one another and share data through Qintel, a Pittsburgh-based cybersecurity company that maintains a large database of website registrations, botnets, and compromised credentials collected from bad actors, according to people familiar with the process.

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