In History - Then and Now

Discussion in 'History' started by Phillyxpat, Apr 28, 2016.

  1. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  2. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  3. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Setting Automatic Dials on Keystone Telephones - 1921 - 16th and Summer Streets

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    Public Ledger 24 Jan 1924


    Sorry really poor quality on image but a significant Philly visual footnote.

    Automatic rotary dials using various exchange prefixes per finger hole via exchanges around the tri-state area was the reason that Keystone Telephone in the Philadelphia area was the preferred business to business telephone over that of the operators at AT&T that connected calls in the early days of the twentieth century and the reason many Philly businesses had two phone companies up until 1945 when AT&T bought out Keystone.


     
  4. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  5. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  6. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Rumors of a Sugar Delivery - Grocery Store Germantown and Indiana Avenues - Nov 1919

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    Public Ledger 24 Nov 1919

    Continued disruption of consumption patterns of commodities such as sugar following WWI. “Voluntary rationing”, “Meatless Mondays”, “Wheatless Wednesdays”, brain child of Director Herbert Hoover of U.S. Food Administration in efforts to reduce domestic use of food by 15%, commodity controls through June 1919, and then the same agency turned into the American Relief Administration to feed a starving Europe following the war.

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    Judy's Postcards Plus: Vintage Sugar Ration Card WW1 Middlebranch Ohio on eBay


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    #6 Phillyxpat, Apr 29, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2016
  7. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  8. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  9. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Philadelphia Macaroni Company - 11th and Catherine - 1915 - 1920s

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    1915 - Philadelphia Macaroni Manufacturing Company - Left
    Tall building in distance is Gladstone Apartments - 11th and Pine Sts.


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    Public Ledger - 10 Jan 1922


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    Public Ledger 2 July 1920


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    Public Ledger 14 July 1920


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    Public Ledger 22 Oct 1920



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    Present


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  10. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    A. Schoenhut Co - E. Hagert (Adams) and Sepviva Sts. - Toy Manufacturer

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    Phila. Chamber of Commerce 1918/1919
    Idealized image - front half of building on left as actual factory - building on right never built. Trenton Ave elevated railway in background.



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    NY Tribune 13 Nov 1920

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    NY Tribune 13 Nov 1920


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    Minneapolis Journal 25 Nov 1904


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    Chicago Sun Tribune 8 Oct 1911


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    Public Ledger 28 July 1920


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    Public Ledger 6 Aug 1920


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    Public Ledger 21 Aug 1920


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    Inquirer 3 may 1936


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    Present


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  11. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  12. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    1929 NFL Football Schedule – Frankford Yellow Jackets - Ballston Spa NY Daily Journal 13 Sept 1929

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    Of Note: Orange based in Orange/Newark NJ. Stapleton (Staten Island NY) “Stapes” part of a right to a double franchise to exist within NY Giants franchise territory, (separate franchise owned by several different clubs over time, sold by and eventually defaulted back to NY Giants in each case). “Stapes” tied Frankford Yellow Jackets once and beat Philadelphia Eagles once in its short existence.
     
  13. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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  14. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Frankford Hallowe'en season Parade - Frankford Av south of Unity St.- Public Ledger 4 Nov 1930

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    Under Frankford "L". Old Second National Bank building in background to left. Frankford Trust Company building in lighted distance.


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  15. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Hannah Heston Coggins 1854-1902 Native Philadelphia Artist, Suicide Death NYC, 96 Fifth Avenue

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    New York Herald 7 January 1902

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    Philadelphia Inquirer 7 January 1902

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    Interred 1/9/1902
    Aged 48
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    SUICIDE'S BODY BURIED

    The funeral services over the remains of Miss Hannah H. Coggins, the artist, who committed suicide in New York, were held yesterday afternoon. Rev. F.A. Hinckley, pastor of the Spring Garden Unitarian Church, conducted the services. The funeral was private and the interment was made in Woodland Cemetery. Miss Coggins' remains were taken to the residence of Paschal H. Coggins, 5025 McKean avenue, Germantown, on Wednesday.

    Date: Friday, January 10, 1902
    Paper: Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

    Volume: 146 Issue: 10 Page: 10 (Source: Find A Grave Memorial # 156597425)


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  16. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Got no feedback on Hannah Heston Coggins here or on my FB page. I guess a lonely old maid artist killing herself is not a topic people want to deal with or tend to identify with.

    I discovered her obit when doing research for 90 Fifth Ave. where Countess Anne Leary lived in the 1890s. The 90 and 96 got confused in the newspaper archive I was researching on.

    The 96 Fifth Ave address had a lot of traction. It was at one time the biggest and most social mansion in NYC before the Civil War. After the Manhattan Club phase, it was just rented out as studios in a less than fashionable part of Fifth Ave as that social center kept moving uptown until all the big gilded age mansions got built around the beginning of (50th Street to 59th Street) and further up Fifth Ave. on Central Park, the so-called “upper east side”. That whole mixed block of houses between 14th and 15th street got torn down around 1910 to build 10 story fancy fronted, Terra Cotta covered, loft buildings suitable for the printing industry, small issue magazines and fancy office space.

    Even if my interest in genealogy is not great, my interest in a lot of history must rely on genealogy to piece together some of the facts of lives past. People who die without being married or die without children or outlive their children don’t leave behind amateur family genealogists keeping track of siblings, cousins and their descendants. No “green leaves” on those advertised on TV genealogy subscription things.

    It is helpful if other genealogists have done of lot of work before you. Pulling together the life of the little orphan girl Hannah H. Coggins and some of the items mentioned in the news articles make some sense. The fact mentioned that Hannah H Coggins was once wealthy. She came from the family of a businessman and that is probably the source of that fact. That fact that her father was an engraver leads to a little girl’s interest in her father’s trade.

    The crux of probable sadness in her life is the death of her mother in 1858 when she is about four and her father running off to war around age 40 as a private to die at Antietam. Interesting fact to me was that he was in the 28th Pennsylvania Volunteers Company P.

    My own Great Grandfather was a private in the 28th Pa. Company A. My g-grandfather made a splash in that battle in a daring feat of wrestling a Confederate flag bearer for his Confederate flag and getting it in the middle of the battle, a battle that Edward H. Coggins was wounded and died as a result of. My great grandfather a 19 year old Private - Immigrant. BTW (Fuckface Donald).

    Other records of a military nature has his wounding, Edward Coggins, on the 17th of September and his death on the 21st. The Philadelphia County Death Certificate is listing the DOD as October 6, 1862. I think the date of over two weeks difference from the military records DOD is no doubt bureaucracy demanding a death cert in order to bury a body in a box from the Virginia battleground.

    I am impressed how fast a coffin gets shipped, no doubt via train, north in the middle of a war. Seeing the Death Certificate, before seeing a book about the genealogy of a John Kirk and his descendants’, has Edward listed as single, which I thought as a mistake, but on further research on Find a Grave, I found his wife had preceded him in death, so in fact he was single.

    In any case, Hannah was on her own, an orphan, being probably brought up by relatives after the death of her mother and then her father, she sought out a life of art and in the end she was alone, an anonymous person in NYC who left Philly to seek more opportunities there than her native provincial town could provide her. “The endless city never sleeps; it just goes on and on…”


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    Biography - Library Company of Philadelphia


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    Source: Find A Grave Memorial# 98402811


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    Genealogy of John Kirk Born 1660 - Intelligencer Press Doylestown Pa. 1912-13, Page 199


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  17. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    No I didn't feel up to making a comment - a very sad tale - especially living in NY with hardly a soul to depend on.
     
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  18. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Thanks Titus for your comment.

    I had a grandmother who wanted to explore the possibility of being a doctor in her teen years in the 1880s, read about it in some woman’s magazine. Her father had the means to give his daughter a higher education but completely vetoed it because she was a female. In the end he lost everything in terms of assets because he co-signed the mortgage note on the local Irish Catholic church in Mt. Carmel Pa. that defaulted on that mortgage etc. Seems to me if he invested in his daughter as a doctor, he would have died a rich man instead of a poor one.

    In the case of Hannah Coggins, reading many newspaper accounts, I think she was in the process of trying to sublease her studio and get rid of unnecessary furniture to go and live with an elderly aunt in Philly for reasons of health. That probably giving up her independence as an artist, meager as it was, may have been the trigger for the way she chose to die.

    Nobody will ever know.

    Also found this advertisement. Did not know that 96 Fifth Avenue had an elevator in its later days but its rich clientele in its Manhattan Club days could have afforded it. No doubt building it in the back yard as extension of building.


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    NY Herald 13 Oct 1900



    No photos of the building to be found on the Net. Have only seen a photo somewhere of the front steps of the building as background in a street scene etc. Magnificent structure.


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    Bromley NYC Map - 1879


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  19. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    That little advertisement is very interesting. How many women in those days felt able to go out on their own like that? I hope she is resting in peace.
     
  20. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Tacony Club House - Circa 1908-1909 – 4619 Longshore St. at Marsden St. – Clyde S Adams Architect


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    Tacony Club - Built 1908-1909 - Architect Clyde S. Adams - Cost $20,000


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  21. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    Must have been beautiful in its day - even denuded of ornament it's a very handsome structure.
     
  22. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    $30,000 Cloth Robbery - Midnight - 3805 Frankford Ave - Public Ledger Story 13 Aug 1920

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    3805 Frankford Ave - Present - Empty lot to left is site of second building now torn down that had a connecting bridge to it over a courtyard between the buildings - the bridge as mentioned by watchman in article.


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    Looking South to Frankford Junction


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  23. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Cohocksink Church Philadelphia - N. Franklin St and (Columbia) Cecil B. Moore Ave.

    While doing some history research I ran into an image of a distant church spire 1909 with a view from 10th Street and Columbia (Cecil B Moore) Avenue in Philly.

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    1909


    ("Cohocksink" - a Lenape Indian word for "pine lands".)

    I found an image of the original church 1895 which looked much more exotic from the distance.

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    1895


    The Congregation had a troubling historic footnote, mired in race relations in the changing urban landscapes of 1900 America.

    http://kennethwmilano.com/page/Encyclopaedia/PresbyterianChurchesinKensington/tabid/200/Default.aspx

    "...In 1890, Cohocksink was one of the large churches in North Central Philadelphia, reporting 696 members, and 544 pupils in its Sunday school. Ten years later it had lost half of its membership, and continued to decline for the next 15 years. As members moved away because of racial change in the community, leadership and financial resources dwindled, and internal strife further weakened the congregation. In 1915 the church asked the Presbytery of Philadelphia to dissolve it. The congregation's lingering resentment toward those they blamed for bringing its fellowship and ministry to an end found expression in this provision of its petition: "We favor and support the transfer. . of the property. . . to the Trustees of Presbytery, the church building to be sold by them. . . (but not to a colored church or organization)." Proceeds from the sale of the property were placed in a Cohocksink Presbyterian Church Memorial Fund, with income designated for the support of needy Presbyterian churches and missions in Philadelphia..."


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    Public Ledger 6 Jul 1916
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    This image from 1916 merely states that the steeplejack is working on the steeple. It does not mention if it is a fix up or a take down or just a quick fix for a quick sale per info above.


    Which leads to the present day site of a once great North Philly congregation.

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  24. Titus

    Titus Well-Known Member

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    Very very sad.
     
  25. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    William Lukens Elkins Mansion - N Broad and Stiles Streets - 1900 to Present

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    1900


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    1895 City of Philadelphia - Bromley Map



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    1925


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  26. ZARK

    ZARK Well-Known Member

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  27. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Zark - There is I think a residual streak of ugly R/E greed and indifference that goes back to the beast of Urban Renewal of the 1950s forward that threw out the baby, the bathwater, the tub and barn next door as well in many parts of Philly. Especially towards older poorer neighborhoods and their buildings that have lost their luster but not their true character over time. If it can’t be put into a glossy brochure or immediately available to flip, there is zero imagination or Philly soul in a lot of these preservation votes.
     
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  28. Scoats

    Scoats Well-Known Member

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    Wow. They reused the mansion as part of the hotel. Crazy.

    What a shame that all that density was lost for a McDonalds. Maybe someday soon the site will turn back to higher density.
     
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  29. Phillyxpat

    Phillyxpat Harrowgateer

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    Pearce Tires - 21st and Clearfield Streets (W. Lippencott St.) - Public Ledger 13 Dec 1917

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    The image in the illustration of the building is the building facing W.Lippencott St and not Clearfield on the other end of the factory. On a Google Maps close up, the round niche of the top center of building has a painted 1902 date. So factory is likely a retrofit of an old mill to make tires.


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