Register
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Gladys's Avatar
    Gladys is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    7,660

    Default Applied for more than 200 jobs.

    Laura Wesolowski


    Is this an ad for a job wanted or a commentary...
    "If you're going to tell people the truth, you better make them laugh; otherwise they'll kill you."
    - attributed to both George Bernard Shaw & Oscar Wilde


    "I never clean up after my dogs, because I have trained them to run with me off leash while I ride my bike the wrong way on the sidewalk."
    - LUCas
    Originally Posted by Dave L We need to focus on banning both singers who crap on the sidewalk and dogs that annoy people with their singing. - Mondo

  2. #2
    Alley's Avatar
    Alley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,245

    Default

    The comments below the video are interesting. My parents could not afford college. I wanted to go so I figured it out working my way through taking night and weekend classes. Yes, I missed the life of living on campus too bad that's life. I wish they would have asked her if she had thought about the debt while in school and how she was going to pay it back. She needs to take whatever job or two or three she can find and move forward.

  3. #3
    annie's Avatar
    annie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    West Philly
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gladys View Post
    Laura Wesolowski


    Is this an ad for a job wanted or a commentary...
    It makes more sense in the context of the entire article:
    DIMINISHING RETURNS

    Looking at her resume, she did the Peace Corp and appears to have worked/interned while in school so most of the Philly.com trolls' criticisms aren't fair. She probably could have done other things to reduce her debt load overall but she went to the Fels Institute of Government at Penn - it's not like she took out a ton of loans for art school or something. With that many applications, she's likely applied for jobs below her education level but McDonald's and the like really don't want to hire someone with a MA (will leave as soon as there's a better job) and even then there are a ton of applicants for every open position.

  4. #4
    StrangeTanks's Avatar
    StrangeTanks is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Kensington
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    I remember having a heated debate with someone when I was in college. Whether college was an investment, or a growing experience.

    Basically, my opinion is, if your looking for a career and consider college an investment. Google what is being lobbied heavily in DC and you have a list of careers.

    Public policy is pretty damn near the bottom of the list...and I would predict its only going to get worse.

  5. #5
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    East Falls
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by annie View Post
    With that many applications, she's likely applied for jobs below her education level but McDonald's and the like really don't want to hire someone with a MA (will leave as soon as there's a better job) and even then there are a ton of applicants for every open position.
    I know people who have been willing to take any and all jobs and keep getting turned away for that exact reason. They're being told "you're over-educated and will probably leave the first opportunity that comes up".

    I think the people who like to **** on those in Laura's situation aren't understanding how bad the current job market is. Low-level positions are flooded with applicants. Getting a job at this point is basically a crap shoot, especially for recent grads.

  6. #6
    ColeenH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Falls, Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alley View Post
    She needs to take whatever job or two or three she can find and move forward.
    1) Those jobs likely won't hire her because she's overqualified.

    2) If she were to get those jobs, potential employers would look at her resume and see those jobs and assume she's not keeping her relevant skills up-to-date and toss her resume.

  7. #7
    Gladys's Avatar
    Gladys is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    7,660

    Default

    rock, hard place. ah yes i remember it well.
    "If you're going to tell people the truth, you better make them laugh; otherwise they'll kill you."
    - attributed to both George Bernard Shaw & Oscar Wilde


    "I never clean up after my dogs, because I have trained them to run with me off leash while I ride my bike the wrong way on the sidewalk."
    - LUCas
    Originally Posted by Dave L We need to focus on banning both singers who crap on the sidewalk and dogs that annoy people with their singing. - Mondo

  8. #8
    LWesolowski is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I appreciate the time you took to watch my video and read the series in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

    I grew up in Cleveland, Ohio to a blue collar family. My parents sacrificed a lot to provide my brother and I with a quality education, and I am extremely grateful. I had never planned on going to college but my family told me it would be a shame to waste my intellectual talent on a blue collar career. I received a quality scholarship for my undergraduate degree, worked various part-time and work study positions, and still took out loans to cover things like books and fees.

    The bulk of my debt is from my Masters degree. Most grad programs do not have the same access to scholarships as undergrad programs, and UPenn certainly does not. I received some assistance from the Peace Corps Fellows program in return for work in an underprivileged community, as well as 3 internships during my graduate program. I held a part-time job as well. I had hoped that by going back to school I wouldn't run into the same unemployment problem I faced in the fall of 2008 when I returned from my Peace Corps service. I was wrong.

    I have applied for jobs in and out of my field of study, at and below my skill level, and yes, even jobs in the service industry. I do not have the 7-10 years experience most positions at my level demand, and that is my biggest hurdle. Government on all levels are cutting entry level positions and non-profits are in financial straits. I have been job hunting for over a year at this point. I've had 5 interviews and have yet to receive a viable job offer. I continue to apply to jobs every day with little to no response. In the meantime, I continue to keep my skills up-to-date with unpaid internships and volunteer opportunities.

    So yes, my video is both a job wanted ad and a social commentary. Our educational system is not preparing students for the real world and our economy is not able to handle the influx of post-secondary educated youth. Was I naive to do what I did? Not at all! I was, and still am, well aware of the true cost of higher education and the toll it takes on American youth. Graduate school gave me an opportunity to add to my skill set and kept me housed, clothed, and fed when jobs on all levels weren't available to my age group when the economy tanked.

    If my story helps others to understand the difficulties my generation, then I am happy to tell it. I continue to fight for gainful employment each and every time I send out my resume. But until that interview and job offer come through, hope isn't paying my bills or keeping me fed.

  9. #9
    OffenseTaken is offline Junior Dilettante
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,447

    Default

    Your story rang true from the second I read the headline, I'm afraid. For my first few months in Philadelphia, I filled out application after application begrudgingly, hoping I wouldn't have to take a job as a cashier or a barista, among other things. Not to slight the people who do those jobs: it's just that I already did them when I was in 11th grade. In the meantime I worked in offices for four years, earned a master's degree, TA'd at a fantastic school, and taught at a university in France. It seemed like there was no middle ground between those interviewers who thought my qualifications weren't enough for what they were looking for, and those who thought they were too much.

    There are several factors that made my job search more arduous than it should have been. Some were out of my control, and at least one wasn't: I chose a postgraduate program whose intellectual promise so appealing that I overlooked its dearth of "real-world" benefits. There are a tremendous number of people out there who believe that a "life of the mind" is more important than getting rich; the problem is that "not being rich" could mean raking in 60K as an assistant professor of Italian at a state university, or it could mean making a quarter of that at Kmart. Or it could mean not hearing from anyone. And universities prey on these people, either for cheap labor as teaching assistants or for their tuition money. Or both, in some perverse cases. People who come from families of modest means, like you and I, are particularly vulnerable.

    I don't know how much of this situation applies to you specifically—you chose at least a more practical-sounding grad program than I did—but I know it certainly applies to many people who are or have been in a similar predicament. I wish I could talk all of them out of grad programs that offer at best a tortuous path to employment.

    In any case it's encouraging to see someone so persistent. And let's count our blessings: we ended up in a beautiful town that's full of good neighbors.

    Quote Originally Posted by LWesolowski View Post
    I appreciate the time you took to watch my video and read the series in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

    I grew up in Cleveland, Ohio to a blue collar family. My parents sacrificed a lot to provide my brother and I with a quality education, and I am extremely grateful. I had never planned on going to college but my family told me it would be a shame to waste my intellectual talent on a blue collar career. I received a quality scholarship for my undergraduate degree, worked various part-time and work study positions, and still took out loans to cover things like books and fees.

    The bulk of my debt is from my Masters degree. Most grad programs do not have the same access to scholarships as undergrad programs, and UPenn certainly does not. I received some assistance from the Peace Corps Fellows program in return for work in an underprivileged community, as well as 3 internships during my graduate program. I held a part-time job as well. I had hoped that by going back to school I wouldn't run into the same unemployment problem I faced in the fall of 2008 when I returned from my Peace Corps service. I was wrong.

    I have applied for jobs in and out of my field of study, at and below my skill level, and yes, even jobs in the service industry. I do not have the 7-10 years experience most positions at my level demand, and that is my biggest hurdle. Government on all levels are cutting entry level positions and non-profits are in financial straits. I have been job hunting for over a year at this point. I've had 5 interviews and have yet to receive a viable job offer. I continue to apply to jobs every day with little to no response. In the meantime, I continue to keep my skills up-to-date with unpaid internships and volunteer opportunities.

    So yes, my video is both a job wanted ad and a social commentary. Our educational system is not preparing students for the real world and our economy is not able to handle the influx of post-secondary educated youth. Was I naive to do what I did? Not at all! I was, and still am, well aware of the true cost of higher education and the toll it takes on American youth. Graduate school gave me an opportunity to add to my skill set and kept me housed, clothed, and fed when jobs on all levels weren't available to my age group when the economy tanked.

    If my story helps others to understand the difficulties my generation, then I am happy to tell it. I continue to fight for gainful employment each and every time I send out my resume. But until that interview and job offer come through, hope isn't paying my bills or keeping me fed.

  10. #10
    OldMama is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bella Vista
    Posts
    2,534

    Default

    I have tremendous sympathy for young people starting out today. The job market is so difficult.

    When I and my friends graduated from college and/or grad school, most of us had pie-in-the-sky degrees: philosophy, city planning, English. Yet we all got jobs because employers valued our degrees. They knew that we were capable of researching, writing, and communicating well. My friends are a deputy mayor, technical writer, development director etc. Who gets these jobs now?

    Even when you try to prepare for a job in this market, things can go very wrong. My own child has a degree in classics and history from a first-class college. He hoped to work for a non-profit in development, communications, some such thing that would have been entirely feasible thirty years ago with a liberal arts degree. Nothing panned out. So he went to an Ivy grad school and got a master's and teaching certificate. The school where he student taught loved him and was anxious to hire him when he graduated. Then the district put down a hiring freeze. Oops. He's now teaching abroad, making lots of money, doing a fantastic job, and having a great experience. But he'd like to come home someday and settle down here. Will that ever be possible??

    Good luck to all of you.

  11. #11
    Marquis is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LWesolowski View Post
    My parents sacrificed a lot to provide my brother and I with a quality education
    Quote Originally Posted by OffenseTaken View Post
    People who come from families of modest means, like you and I
    Not trying to be a prick about this, and I know this is an informal place, but it should be me in both cases, not I. Good English helps in getting a job too. I'm not saying you're not getting a job because of your language skills, but little things like this make a difference. Good luck to both of you. [/grammarnazi]

  12. #12
    lemko's Avatar
    lemko is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,620

    Default

    I'd say one should have a "modular resume;" add or subtract from your resume as needed. Use a dumbed-down one saying you have a high school education or less to apply for low-wage service industry jobs. Don't even tell the interviewer you went to college. It's none of his or her business anyway. When you apply for the "dream job," use the "super-duper resume" with all of your educational and career-related experience.

  13. #13
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    East Falls
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lemko View Post
    I'd say one should have a "modular resume;" add or subtract from your resume as needed. Use a dumbed-down one saying you have a high school education or less to apply for low-wage service industry jobs. Don't even tell the interviewer you went to college. It's none of his or her business anyway. When you apply for the "dream job," use the "super-duper resume" with all of your educational and career-related experience.
    This is good advice. I know someone who was told by a placement agency to have a version of her resume showing less than she had, b/c her full resume was scaring away employers.

  14. #14
    OffenseTaken is offline Junior Dilettante
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marquis View Post
    Not trying to be a prick about this, and I know this is an informal place, but it should be me in both cases, not I. Good English helps in getting a job too. I'm not saying you're not getting a job because of your language skills, but little things like this make a difference. Good luck to both of you. [/grammarnazi]
    I'm pretty sure "like" is a conjunction in the second case, which makes me an I, and you an *******. Seriously though: no need to apologize for your concern. I actually did think twice about the pronoun when I wrote it. If it can be shown that "like" is a preposition and the Edit window is still open, I will change it accordingly. But I don't think "like" passes the mouse/table test.

    Quote Originally Posted by lemko View Post
    I'd say one should have a "modular resume;" add or subtract from your resume as needed. Use a dumbed-down one saying you have a high school education or less to apply for low-wage service industry jobs. Don't even tell the interviewer you went to college. It's none of his or her business anyway. When you apply for the "dream job," use the "super-duper resume" with all of your educational and career-related experience.
    When I was applying for retail jobs, I actually did think about doing this, and I have heard of people with PhD's in stuff like History of Consciousness (nothing like Santa Cruz!) doing it so they can work in call centers.

    The reason I never did was because I couldn't think of any better way to account for the past three years of my life. If I were interviewing someone who said "oh, and since May 2007 I've been living off of a mysterious source of income but otherwise just pulling my pud," I would be somewhat more inclined to call the History of Consciousness guy back in. Not much more inclined, but a little. How would you take care of this problem?

  15. #15
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    East Falls
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OffenseTaken View Post
    The reason I never did was because I couldn't think of any better way to account for the past three years of my life. If I were interviewing someone who said "oh, and since May 2007 I've been living off of a mysterious source of income but otherwise just pulling my pud," I would be somewhat more inclined to call the History of Consciousness guy back in. Not much more inclined, but a little. How would you take care of this problem?
    If you weren't working at all (no part-time job) then I don't know how you could, off-hand.

  16. #16
    annie's Avatar
    annie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    West Philly
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    Wharton's Peter Cappelli knows why you can't get a job - Philly.com

    Computer technology makes it easier for job-seekers to apply, but also eliminates many qualified people for consideration when their resumés don’t match complex and mysterious algorithms. Cappelli provides an example of a job-seeker eliminated for an on-point opening because his former title didn’t exactly match the job title for the opening in the company. The wrinkle was that the job title was unique to the company. The only people who could have qualified for that post were people who had already held the job and left it.
    Recently applied to a not exactly high-level position on usajobs.gov and had to answer 80 yes/no questions including, "Have you participated in training classes, workshops, or seminars outside of school that helped you improve your self-management skills (for example, time management, goal setting, career development, etc.)?" and "Have you successfully resolved disagreements among a group of peers in a goal-oriented setting (for example, sports team, work group, theater group, cheerleading squad, etc.)?" Insane.

    As for Laura, when I got laid off in 2009 I contacted people asking them for an "informational interview" because they worked in a slightly different area of the field in which I had been working and wanted to know more about. People generally seemed flattered and willing to talk about themselves and their work for half an hour or so often referring me to others in the area or even back in the mainstream of my field. I did get offers of part-time and contract work pretty quickly. Then someone that I had met with recently and regretted that positions in the company came up so seldom because most employees were long-term two weeks later found out that an employee's husband got a job across the country and was moving. I was on the top of the list to be called. You might want to try that if you haven't already. I found it much more fruitful than traditional networking.

  17. #17
    Seattle is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Even though this thread is old - I thought I would toss my $0.02 in...

    I am older than Laura - at 51 - I have just re-entered the labor market after completing two additional graduate degrees - and like Laura have racked up six figures of debt, which I now have to pay off. The other bit of fun I'm dealing with is that I am trying to enter an industry that A.) was decimated by the 2008 crash, and B.) where the entry-level jobs are typically occupied by someone in the mid to late 20s. Ahhhhh - life is never boring, is it?

    My comments to Laura are two:

    1.) Realize that the "experience-vs-access trick" is an age old issue for all young people - as well as for older (very experienced) people who are trying to penetrate a new industry. I'm running into it now - where I've been told specifically that I would be hired in an instant if only I had ever worked in that specific type of office before. I know it's of little help to you - but please know that you are in a long, long line of people who've experienced this and survived and done well - as well as in the company of people (also like me) who have returned to this portion of the line for the second time - by their own choosing.

    2.) Realize that you are living through the worst crash in the economy since the Great Depression - that the older folks who had their 401k accounts explode are not going to leave those positions soon because of it; those older experienced folks who were laid off earlier in the recession are also back in line - competing with you (and me) for positions at all levels.

    Basically, know that you're not alone - and that the challenges you face are only higher than they would have been before all this happened. I know it's depressing, I know the debt sucks, and I know it's unfair. But, it's also history and where you just happened to have landed (imagine what your problems would be had you landed in 1920s Germany and were Jewish instead). You'll be ok - and (God help me) "...one day this will all seem funny...".

    And to the others who said that graduate degrees in public policy were worthless: ram it. I have a public policy degree from Maryland - and it helped me successfully penetrate and development foreign markets for more than a decade. With all the issues this country faces, we're going to need all the MPAs, MPMs and every other type of degree to get it straightened out. Stop dumping on other peoples educational choices.

    Good luck to you Laura - you'll be ok - if I were in a position to hire you, I would. =)

  18. #18
    RittenhouseGirl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OldMama View Post
    When I and my friends graduated from college and/or grad school, most of us had pie-in-the-sky degrees: philosophy, city planning, English. Yet we all got jobs because employers valued our degrees. They knew that we were capable of researching, writing, and communicating well. My friends are a deputy mayor, technical writer, development director etc. Who gets these jobs now?
    I did technical writing and editing. English grads still go into these careers to a great degree.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldMama View Post
    He's now teaching abroad, making lots of money, doing a fantastic job, and having a great experience. But he'd like to come home someday and settle down here. Will that ever be possible??
    It seems the foreign market can be quite generous to American grads who want to teach. My summa cum laude college roommate could only get a teaching job in the bowels of the Bronx school system after a year of hard searching. She did it for five years before being worn out by the uncivilized rats that pass for students.

    She was hired in Dubai as a teacher under a two-year contract. Free round-trip airline tickets for interviews, free housing, free healthcare, $40,000 a year in salary, and no taxes (neither Dubai or U.S.).

    The students were actually disciplined to boot. While most Americans would like to teach in Europe, those jobs tend to go to U.K. citizens. I don't know where your son teaches, but Asia and the Middle East have a higher demand for Americans and they tend to pay well.

  19. #19
    OldMama is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bella Vista
    Posts
    2,534

    Default

    He teaches in Asia. This year (his second) he's making $60,000 with a flat 10% income tax, a free apartment and health care and two round trip tickers to the US a year. He does not find the students terribly disciplined but he himself was a mega-student so he may be judging harshly. Apparently, the European teaching jobs tend to go to people with more than two years experience wherever they come from so he's hoping to stay in Asia for a bit longer, but in a different country. He's having a great time.

  20. #20
    toxigal is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5,515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OffenseTaken View Post
    I'm pretty sure "like" is a conjunction in the second case, which makes me an I, and you an *******. Seriously though: no need to apologize for your concern. I actually did think twice about the pronoun when I wrote it. If it can be shown that "like" is a preposition and the Edit window is still open, I will change it accordingly. But I don't think "like" passes the mouse/table test.
    i was taught to take out the other person and use the proper pronoun for yourself.

    So, would you say "My parents sacrificed a lot to provide I with a quality education" or "My parents sacrificed a lot to provide me with a quality education"?

    I hope you would say the latter, and therefore "My parents sacrificed a lot to provide my brother and me with a quality education" is correct.

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2