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  1. #41
    RittenhouseGirl is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post
    Please. Don't bother coming.

    And while you're at it, please shack up with CenterCityGuy.

    You two sound like a match made in heaven.

    All I did was ask you about the safety of a location, which you didn't even bother to answer in a decent fashion. My answer above was directed at Naveen.

    I'm married. Brooklyn is not a traditional travel destination for me. It's to see a friend. Period.

  2. #42
    Hospitalitygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RittenhouseGirl View Post
    All I did was ask you about the safety of a location, which you didn't even bother to answer in a decent fashion. My answer above was directed at Naveen.

    I'm married. Brooklyn is not a traditional travel destination for me. It's to see a friend. Period.
    Brooklyn, like Philadelphia, is spotty. There are nice areas (think Park Slope) and some really shady places,Brooklyn Teen Wounded In Rooftop Shootout With Police - NY1.com like this, where much worse happens.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  3. #43
    BarryG is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RittenhouseGirl View Post
    All I did was ask you about the safety of a location, which you didn't even bother to answer in a decent fashion. My answer above was directed at Naveen.

    I'm married. Brooklyn is not a traditional travel destination for me. It's to see a friend. Period.
    Hilarious since you have posted on the board questioning the safety of South St west of Broad and the walk to Whole Foods in Fairmount.

  4. #44
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by thoth View Post
    Why would there be street dealers if it was legalized?
    OH Lee is lost. He also doesn't understand that individuals would also manufacture/grow what they choose as well without the fear of some DEA swat teams attacking their private property.

  5. #45
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarryG View Post
    My question is, with the unemployment rate at nearly 30% for young black men, what happens to these communities when drug revenue is taken away?
    The individuals of the community can live safely w/out having the fear of getting off'd in a cross fire.

  6. #46
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarryG View Post
    Drugs are big money game, they must be responsible for a lot of the money sloshing around many of Philly's neighborhoods.
    This is what happens when you have public 'money' "sloshing" around which crowds out private sector money ... amongst of other reasons why certain neighborhoods are stuck in an endless cycle of dependency and poverty.

  7. #47
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hospitalitygirl View Post
    Brooklyn, like Philadelphia, is spotty. There are nice areas (think Park Slope) and some really shady places,Brooklyn Teen Wounded In Rooftop Shootout With Police - NY1.com like this, where much worse happens.
    Brooklyn is HUGE, is generally 'safe', and is the 2nd wealthiest borough behind Manhattan. Does it have spotty areas, yes but what city or borough in AMerica doesn't?

    That entire area she is heading too is fine and Prospect park is surrounded by beautiful and expensive highrises as well as expensive, pre-war apartments and townhouses. Her address is also South of the Park which is fine as she would have to go North of it (park), to the areas of Bed Stuy, Brownsville, & Bushwick to get to the tough neighborhoods. Tho fairly safe in the daytime if ur comfortable but absolutely no reason to head there.

  8. #48
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    so you're saying drug dealers are GOOD for poor neighborhoods?
    Drugs, in general, are one of the last pure free market economies left in America. Take away the violence (which you would IF legal and IF the only incentive for govt to do that was freedom and liberty not tax revenue and control thru regulation) .... and I can't really think of anything in America circa 2013 that is more free!

  9. #49
    Hospitalitygirl's Avatar
    Hospitalitygirl is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickTheCage View Post
    Brooklyn is HUGE, is generally 'safe', and is the 2nd wealthiest borough behind Manhattan. Does it have spotty areas, yes but what city or borough in AMerica doesn't?

    That entire area she is heading too is fine and Prospect park is surrounded by beautiful and expensive highrises as well as expensive, pre-war apartments and townhouses. Her address is also South of the Park which is fine as she would have to go North of it (park), to the areas of Bed Stuy, Brownsville, & Bushwick to get to the tough neighborhoods. Tho fairly safe in the daytime if ur comfortable but absolutely no reason to head there.
    Thanks, I know. My daughter lives there. I have seen the ****ty and the nice.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  10. #50
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hospitalitygirl View Post
    Thanks, I know. My daughter lives there. I have seen the ****ty and the nice.
    Where does she live?

    When we lived in Mhttn I would spent a lot of time in Bklyn (friends) and came very close to purchasing in Bklyn Heights. Ended up having the wife end her career to become a stay at home and became a 'hick' as our friends like to call us (lol).

  11. #51
    Hospitalitygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickTheCage View Post
    Where does she live?

    When we lived in Mhttn I would spent a lot of time in Bklyn (friends) and came very close to purchasing in Bklyn Heights. Ended up having the wife end her career to become a stay at home and became a 'hick' as our friends like to call us (lol).
    Ft. Greene; teaches in Midwood at the high school, and spent a summer student teaching in E. New York. That was pretty awful.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  12. #52
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarryG View Post
    My question is, with the unemployment rate at nearly 30% for young black men, what happens to these communities when drug revenue is taken away?
    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    so you're saying drug dealers are GOOD for poor neighborhoods?
    Quote Originally Posted by Geno View Post
    I have to echo the incredulity here. As an economic enterprise for the foot soldiers who do the hustling and the dying, the drug trade sucks. They make less thsan minimum wage. It's about staus for them, not money. I don't see ANY positive so I suppose there would be no negative if it ceased to exist.
    The thought that comes to my mind sort of springs off Barry's question, which is what happens happens when you take "employment" away from people (viewing the drug trade as employment, if illigetimate employ. If you take away drug revenue, surely the people formerly employed in the drug trade (or those who would have been) will find other sources of revenue. Without an influx of new legitimate jobs, what will those people get involved in to make up that revenue shortfall?

  13. #53
    eldondre is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    The thought that comes to my mind sort of springs off Barry's question, which is what happens happens when you take "employment" away from people (viewing the drug trade as employment, if illigetimate employ. If you take away drug revenue, surely the people formerly employed in the drug trade (or those who would have been) will find other sources of revenue. Without an influx of new legitimate jobs, what will those people get involved in to make up that revenue shortfall?
    I don't really buy this argument as a legitimate reason not to legalize drugs. the easy answer of course is that they won't make it up, it will result in a net loss in revenue for those employed in the drug trade just as allowing competition in alcohol sales will result in a net loss of revenue for the state stores...or the mob was never really able to replace the loss of illegal booze sales. today minorities in poor urban neighborhoods are far more likely to drop out of school, the belief is they are joining the lucrative drug trade. with that allure gone, so is the allure of dropping out. it is also incorrect to assume that new jobs, with lower pay, won't be created. moreover, one can assume that the legalized drugs will also fund treatment and perhaps other social services. and you can't ignore the cost of dealing with the trade in terms of police enforcement and jails. these cause taxes to be higher and job growth to be lower.
    "It has shown me that everything is illuminated in the light of the past"
    Jonathan Safran Foer

  14. #54
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    The thought that comes to my mind sort of springs off Barry's question, which is what happens happens when you take "employment" away from people (viewing the drug trade as employment, if illigetimate employ. If you take away drug revenue, surely the people formerly employed in the drug trade (or those who would have been) will find other sources of revenue. Without an influx of new legitimate jobs, what will those people get involved in to make up that revenue shortfall?
    I understand why you are discussing and dont think you are advocating to maintain prohibition for 'employment' reasons but ur quote i put in bold is an entirely different issue to discuss, no?

  15. #55
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    today minorities in poor urban neighborhoods are far more likely to drop out of school, the belief is they are joining the lucrative drug trade. with that allure gone, so is the allure of dropping out. it is also incorrect to assume that new jobs, with lower pay, won't be created.
    While this is true one can not discount who their role models are, aren't, and why.

  16. #56
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    I don't really buy this argument as a legitimate reason not to legalize drugs.
    I wasn't trying to sell it as such. See below.

    Quote Originally Posted by NickTheCage View Post
    I understand why you are discussing and dont think you are advocating to maintain prohibition for 'employment' reasons but ur quote i put in bold is an entirely different issue to discuss, no?
    It's a separate but related issue. The question I'm asking goes more towards: ok, you ended the drug trade, but there still aren't any proper jobs for the people here (young men in particular) so what's the chance they turn to some other sort of crime to make money? Is the drug trade the problem -- or a bad symptom of another problem, which is a lack of jobs?
    Last edited by Naveen; 02-12-2013 at 06:05 PM.

  17. #57
    NickTheCage is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    It's a separate but related issue. The question I'm asking goes more towards: ok, you ended the drug trade, but there still aren't any proper jobs for the people here (young men in particular) so what's the chance they turn to some other sort of crime to make money? Is the drug trade the problem -- or a bad symptom of another problem, which is a lack of jobs?
    Well I'm sure government will have a plan to address that so you should sleep well if drugs are legalized, no?

  18. #58
    eldondre is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    I wasn't trying to sell it as such. See below.



    It's a separate but related issue. The question I'm asking goes more towards: ok, you ended the drug trade, but there still aren't any proper jobs for the people here (young men in particular) so what's the chance they turn to some other sort of crime to make money? Is the drug trade the problem -- or a bad symptom of another problem, which is a lack of jobs?
    i could see a short term spike in crime but it seems unlikely that people not employed in the drug trade are suddenly ALL going to switch to low return crime. when prohibition ended what happened to all the thugs? did crime go up? poberty will always exist. drugs are not a symptom...the returns in illicit drugs are dependent on scarcity which is driven by laws. interestingly the more successful the drug war is, the higher the profit margins on drugs.
    "It has shown me that everything is illuminated in the light of the past"
    Jonathan Safran Foer

  19. #59
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    drugs are not a symptom...
    The drug trade is a symptom of a lack of jobs.

  20. #60
    Hospitalitygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    The drug trade is a symptom of a lack of jobs.
    No it isn't.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

 

 

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