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  1. #1
    Malloy's Avatar
    Malloy is offline Administrator
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    Default Windows - All wood vs. Aluminum clad / wood?

    I understand that the exterior side of all wood windows will require maintenance (paint) based on how the finish holds up to the weather. I know the aluminum clad windows just need to be cleaned from time to time.

    If maintained properly, is it safe to say that wood/wood Marvin windows will last a long time?

    Approx how much more $$$ are wood/aluminum clad windows over all wood windows? 5%? 20%?

    I honestly like the look of wood exteriors better...plus I will be able to match my windows and openings exactly. (which is proper to when the home was built) Would I be making a mistake by skipping the aluminum clad exterior?

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  2. #2
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malloy View Post
    I understand that the exterior side of all wood windows will require maintenance (paint) based on how the finish holds up to the weather. I know the aluminum clad windows just need to be cleaned from time to time.

    If maintained properly, is it safe to say that wood/wood Marvin windows will last a long time?

    Approx how much more $$$ are wood/aluminum clad windows over all wood windows? 5%? 20%?

    I honestly like the look of wood exteriors better...plus I will be able to match my windows and openings exactly. (which is proper to when the home was built) Would I be making a mistake by skipping the aluminum clad exterior?

    Thanks
    We've done 19 Marvins so far, unclad, and we couldn't be happier. We've done fixed, casements, double-hung, full-screen, and half-screen. We plan on doing a few per year until there are no more drafty parts in the house. When a storm blows up, I hang out in our rebuilt sunroom, snug as a bug. The wind doesn't get through at all. I know it's bad because I see the boughs blowing this way and that. It's surreal.

    Every year our gas bills go down, to the point where they're becoming somewhat reasonable. I figure I'd rather put the money into the house than into the gas bill. Plus, it's not not freezing your butt off.

    We put the first painted Marvin in about 6 years ago. I see no signs of deterioration.

  3. #3
    NJbound is offline Guest
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    like Ross says, wood will last quite a while and look great. Of course not as long as aluminum but long enough to keep you well into your golden years, Malloy

  4. #4
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    I have 101 year old wood windows on my house and the wood has held up nicely with very little deterioration. We had our windows restored by Chestnut Hill Windows over the winter. They did a nice job. The window is removed, paint stripped, glass replaced with double pane glass, weather stripping put on, repainted and reinstalled. They also replace the weight and pulley system with a clock spring syustem and insulate the cavity where the weights were.

    Not as air tight as a new window but a big improvement. They look great with the fresh coat of paint and we can finally open and close them with ease. There was some rot hear and there on the windows and they get filled with epoxy prior to repainting.

    If you already have wood windows this may be an option for you.

  5. #5
    Malloy's Avatar
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    I do have original wood windows, but I think that service would be ~$700 per window for me.

    I can get new Marvins for ~$1200 each installed. I'm doing 4 or 5 total. Call me crazy, but the new Marvins sound like a better deal. The Marvins will also save me $1500 with the tax credit!

    Quote Originally Posted by stonefly View Post
    I have 101 year old wood windows on my house and the wood has held up nicely with very little deterioration. We had our windows restored by Chestnut Hill Windows over the winter. They did a nice job. The window is removed, paint stripped, glass replaced with double pane glass, weather stripping put on, repainted and reinstalled. They also replace the weight and pulley system with a clock spring syustem and insulate the cavity where the weights were.

    Not as air tight as a new window but a big improvement. They look great with the fresh coat of paint and we can finally open and close them with ease.

    If you already have wood windows this may be an option for you.
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  6. #6
    Malloy's Avatar
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    Hmm, so I learn that the Marvin wood (non clad) Tilt Pac units are not eligible for the tax incentive.
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  7. #7
    stonefly's Avatar
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    The $700 figure is accurate depending on the window size. I think our price ranged from $550 to $750 per window.

    I am no expert but I would guess the Marvin's will pay for themselves if you live in your house for a while since they'll be more efficient. The tax credit will help costs even out too (if the window you chose qualifies).

    There is the environmental benefit of restoring versus replacing if that is something that your into.

  8. #8
    NJbound is offline Guest
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    then go for the alum ones. Apparently the wood ones are not energy efficient enough for the credit


    Quote Originally Posted by Malloy View Post
    Hmm, so I learn that the Marvin wood (non clad) Tilt Pac units are not eligible for the tax incentive.

  9. #9
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    ShoshTrvls is online now Senior Member
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    As I posted on another thread, Chris Stock just put 4 new Pellas in my house -- aluminum exterior, wood interior, double hung, and tax credit compliant. They look great and I don't know that I've ever had windows that seal that tight.

    I left the first floor (older, all wood) windows undone, thinking that I would have Chestnut Hill refurbish them, fearful that the Pellas wouldn't look good enough to be at street level. But none of that -- at the next opportunity, I'm going to put the same Pellas on the first floor.

 

 

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