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  1. #1
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    Default cold in from mail slot

    We have a mail slot in our front door, which has a flap on it, but it is letting in a lot of cold air. Any suggestions? I have though of installing a glass door in front of it, but any other ideas out there?

  2. #2
    Eastcoast is offline Senior Member
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    Does it have an interior flap as well, I have seen some that have both an exterior and interior flap.

  3. #3
    paul100 is offline Member
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    Most of all the newer mailslots do have two flaps. You can get some self stick weather strip and put it behind the flap.

  4. #4
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul100 View Post
    Most of all the newer mailslots do have two flaps. You can get some self stick weather strip and put it behind the flap.
    Actually if you look on Home Depots page you would be suprised that it seems they are all one flap.

    I am thinking I may make my own rubber flap to put inside. Not sure how I will attach it. I dont think adhesive will last too long. Will have to see if there is enough room on the screw to screw it to the frame.

  5. #5
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    I am probably going to end up throwing down the few hundred bucks to install a storm door.

  6. #6
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    I like storm doors, but they're a maintenance headache. Unless you actually want to have a storm door (and I've installed them in my own home because I like to have them them, despite their hassles), I'd try to weatherize the mailslot first. First I'd buy one for the inside and install it - I've done this in the past and it's worked well. Second I'd replace or at least reinstall the one on the outside, taking care that it make a good seal both against the door and also that the slot closes properly. The combination of the last two is generally enough to take care of it.

  7. #7
    Eastcoast is offline Senior Member
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    Looks like you need the Draft Dodger son!

    North America's Best Insulated Mail Slot - The Draft Dodger™ Insulated Mail Slot


    It always amazes me the sheer number of specialty manufactured products that are out there, how many of these things are these guys selling?

    Anyway, this looks like the insulated mail slot to end all mail slots, it even has some type of draft reducing internal brush setup. It's in the $50 dollar range and I feel certain that you'll be the first on your block to own...The Draft Dodger!

  8. #8
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy ross View Post
    I like storm doors, but they're a maintenance headache. Unless you actually want to have a storm door (and I've installed them in my own home because I like to have them them, despite their hassles), I'd try to weatherize the mailslot first. First I'd buy one for the inside and install it - I've done this in the past and it's worked well. Second I'd replace or at least reinstall the one on the outside, taking care that it make a good seal both against the door and also that the slot closes properly. The combination of the last two is generally enough to take care of it.
    First thanks to East coast for the draft dodger idea.... that may be the way to go. I really need to decide to go with the 50 dollar draft dodger idea or spend a couple hundred more and get a storm door, which I am sure will insulate better while giving me the option to leave my front door open in nice days while keeping bugs out and my dog in. Curious why the storm doors are maintenance headaches? I should add, the door is recessed and under a covered area about 3 feet deep, so weather should not be a big issue with the door. I was looking at an anderson door at HD that seemed to be pretty good quality.

    thanks

  9. #9
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    Neb
    Neb is offline Senior Member
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    After several Netflix movies got chewed up by my dog, I sealed off the mail slot and got a large, locked mailbox and bolted it up outside the house. That solved the draft problems too.
    Last edited by Neb; 01-03-2013 at 10:52 AM. Reason: corrected spelling
    "I seen a tortoise attack a peacock once. That sh*t was epic." --Philadelphia Zoo employee

  10. #10
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    thanks
    Last edited by qweezyq; 01-03-2013 at 10:57 AM. Reason: repetitive post

  11. #11
    DavidT is offline Senior Member
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    In the old country, we used to use these things Brievenbusborstel Bruin . Basically a 'brush' that keeps some of the draft out. Was better than nothing.

  12. #12
    Naveen is offline Senior Member
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    I have this problem too. I'm gonna have to take a look at the Draft Dodger. Luckily I have a vestibule, so that really does 90% of the work. What a difference when the vestibule door is left open!

  13. #13
    qweezyq is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naveen View Post
    I have this problem too. I'm gonna have to take a look at the Draft Dodger. Luckily I have a vestibule, so that really does 90% of the work. What a difference when the vestibule door is left open!
    I have an open love affair with vestibules. especially beautifully tiled ones with etched glass doors. I am very jealous I don't have one.

  14. #14
    dcss1205 is offline Banned
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    Thumb tack a large piece of heavy cloth creating a curtain.
    This is analogous to what you do to a drafty window.
    Even with a new storm door this should still be installed.

  15. #15
    AsYouWere is offline Banned
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    Fill it with spray foam with both sides plated over.

    Hang a basket on door for mail afterwards, or....

    Get a new insulated door and mailbox.

  16. #16
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    "The winds of March that make my heart a dancer"...

    Also treat storm doors like nice, stiff sails, ripping them out or careless hands and off if the hinges. Then..

    "Something there is that doesn't love a wall"...

    Also applies to storm door screens.

    We have full view painted poplar storm doors, five of them. Every Spring it's out with five panes of glass and in with five panes of screens, one of which is invariably rescreened for that year. Then the weather swells and shrinks them, and they drag on the thresholds. Still, I love the fresh air and the sunlight. Just this year I had to buy another new one because I couldn't figure out how to replace the broken glass pane otherwise. Got it done just in time for the winter.

    Quote Originally Posted by qweezyq View Post
    First thanks to East coast for the draft dodger idea.... that may be the way to go. I really need to decide to go with the 50 dollar draft dodger idea or spend a couple hundred more and get a storm door, which I am sure will insulate better while giving me the option to leave my front door open in nice days while keeping bugs out and my dog in. Curious why the storm doors are maintenance headaches? I should add, the door is recessed and under a covered area about 3 feet deep, so weather should not be a big issue with the door. I was looking at an anderson door at HD that seemed to be pretty good quality.

    thanks
    Last edited by billy ross; 01-03-2013 at 07:52 PM.

  17. #17
    wooglin is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eastcoast View Post
    Looks like you need the Draft Dodger son!

    North America's Best Insulated Mail Slot - The Draft Dodger™ Insulated Mail Slot

    It always amazes me the sheer number of specialty manufactured products that are out there, how many of these things are these guys selling?

    Anyway, this looks like the insulated mail slot to end all mail slots, it even has some type of draft reducing internal brush setup. It's in the $50 dollar range and I feel certain that you'll be the first on your block to own...The Draft Dodger!
    I have the Draft Dodger installed in my front door. I searched long & hard to find it. I couldn't believe there was no one in USA making something like this. Draft Dodger comes from Canada. It has 2 features - the interior and/or the exterior has a gasket AND a magnetic catch/closure. Secondly, there are the brushes top & bottom inside the slot. The problem with the brushes? The mail man does not love to push mail thru them. If you have enough mail & it is stiff enough, he/she can easily push it thru the brushes. However if there is only one or 2 #10 envelopes, they fold up inside the slot.
    After a few months, the top set of brushes broke off my slot due to the mailman pushing too much thru. I have not replaced it yet and mail comes inside a bit better. But my mail seldom gets all the way inside to the floor - probably because my slot is so low on the door. The brushes hold it back a bit, the inside flap is always pushed half open and occasionally the front flap too which of course defeats the purpose of the draft dodging purpose. If your slot is high enough (as USPS actually requires), you shouldn't have this issue.

  18. #18
    bobvila is offline Member
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    i've used this for years and been happy:
    Product Information

    if you have a metal door they just send you a sheet of almost refrigerator magnet material which is attached across the top and seals against the door. if you have a wood door they send an additional sheet of adhesive backed material which attracts the magnet. the plus side is you can use any exterior mail slot (or keep your existing). the down side is that occasionally the mail man won't push hard enough when it is only a flimsy item (such as a single letter or when menus get dropped off) and it gets stuck in the middle. but overall it works well and stops drafts, especially since i have a single door directly exposed to the weather (no storm door)

  19. #19
    AsYouWere is offline Banned
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    Somebody needs to spring for a NEW DOOR - and a MAILBOX.

 

 

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