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  1. #1
    Pippi L is offline Senior Member
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    Default Sheetrocking a room?

    Does anyone have any idea of the ballpark cost of sheetrocking an entire room (walls and ceiling)?

  2. #2
    LUCas is offline Senior Member
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    I'd say, very roughly, $2/sq. ft. There are some fixed costs for the job (delivery of materials, multiple trips out to do finish work) that would increase the cost per sq. ft on smaller jobs. But should give you a rough idea.
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    longtimephilly is offline Senior Member
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    Are you doing this yourself or hiring someone?

  4. #4
    Moonraker is offline Rocket Scientist
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    If you contract, be sure to have three coats of mud over the joints. Usually 3", 6", 10".

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    That's about right, assuming all the framing is true and level. But there are basic minimums also. Need to set up, clean up etc... $2 a square is $64 a sheet. If the rock was on site, with mud there, that seems doable.

    Quote Originally Posted by LUCas View Post
    I'd say, very roughly, $2/sq. ft. There are some fixed costs for the job (delivery of materials, multiple trips out to do finish work) that would increase the cost per sq. ft on smaller jobs. But should give you a rough idea.
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  6. #6
    stock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonraker View Post
    If you contract, be sure to have three coats of mud over the joints. Usually 3", 6", 10".
    Correct, but most important is that Green mud goes on first coat, then Blue on second and third.
    Chris
    Philadelphia Salvage
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    542 Carpenter Lane - Retail and Custom
    2234 W. Westmoreland "The Foundry"

    "Anyone who would trade their freedom for safety
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    - Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
    Pippi L is offline Senior Member
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    Thank you for all the responses. I wanted a ballpark so that I can start saving up and have something at least remotely close to the amount needed before I start bothering professionals for bids. I appreciate the feedback -- now I know what to shoot for!

  8. #8
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    And how much to lam 3/8 on the lids and float the walls with 90? That seems like a better solution to me. You end up with no issues with the casework and you get harder wall surfaces, plus less demo material to haul away, plus no problems hauling rock through an old house, or storing it. Less time and effort taking stuff away, less time and effort bringing stuff to the job.
    Last edited by billy ross; 10-07-2011 at 07:43 PM.

  9. #9
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    StrangeTanks is offline Senior Member
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    $60 per sheet seams a little high to me but I've heard of people paying more. As far as getting the drywall in the house, my favorite way to do it is to take out a window and have the drywall delivered and boomed in through the window.

    Most of the drywall guys I've seen use the setting type compound for the first coat, and maybe even the second if its a smaller area. That way they can get 2 or 3 coats on in the first day. I'm always amazed by people that do it well, I completely stink at finishing drywall.

  10. #10
    stock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy ross View Post
    And how much to lam 3/8 on the lids and float the walls with 90? That seems like a better solution to me. You end up with no issues with the casework and you get harder wall surfaces, plus less demo material to haul away, plus no problems hauling rock through an old house, or storing it. Less time and effort taking stuff away, less time and effort bringing stuff to the job.
    You could even use 1/4 drywall Bill. Only issue is the walls may not be smooth because of whatever it's going over. And the #1 reason people rock is the ceiling is failing. If the ceiling is failing, you can mark where the studs are on the walls, use washers and 3" screws to "suck" up the failing plaster. Then laminate the ceiling in 1/2 in. glue and screwing, it's amazing how flat and smooth it ends up at.
    Chris
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  11. #11
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    Yeah unless there's a tree or utilty wires in the way...and usually there's a minimum charge for delivery. I ran into this problem having my 3rd floor sheetrocked in my Fishtown house. No one would do it because I had wires next my house--ie. on my neighbor's house. The sheets ended up having to be sliced on the back in 3rds to make it up the narrow stairway. Annoying.

    Pippi L, what Stock said about factoring into cost is important--if the existing sheetrock is removed, the walls have to be reframed and that's an additional cost. You can also have existing sheetrock coated--that's a bit cheaper. I had that done in one room after wasting 5 days removing old paper wallpaper that destroyed the walls. The only reason I can think of to resheetrock rather than coat is when there isn't sheetrock there--like I took out the old ceiling and vaulted the room into the attic.
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  12. #12
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by stock View Post
    You could even use 1/4 drywall Bill. Only issue is the walls may not be smooth because of whatever it's going over. And the #1 reason people rock is the ceiling is failing. If the ceiling is failing, you can mark where the studs are on the walls, use washers and 3" screws to "suck" up the failing plaster. Then laminate the ceiling in 1/2 in. glue and screwing, it's amazing how flat and smooth it ends up at.

    I said float the walls, not rock them. You get a much harder and more durable end result, and the walls don't suffer so much from gravity and bouncing, so they're more likely to still be keyed in.

  13. #13
    stock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy ross View Post
    I said float the walls, not rock them. You get a much harder and more durable end result, and the walls don't suffer so much from gravity and bouncing, so they're more likely to still be keyed in.
    Sorry, misread that.
    Chris
    Philadelphia Salvage
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  14. #14
    Pippi L is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brooke View Post
    Yeah unless there's a tree or utilty wires in the way...and usually there's a minimum charge for delivery. I ran into this problem having my 3rd floor sheetrocked in my Fishtown house. No one would do it because I had wires next my house--ie. on my neighbor's house. The sheets ended up having to be sliced on the back in 3rds to make it up the narrow stairway. Annoying.

    Pippi L, what Stock said about factoring into cost is important--if the existing sheetrock is removed, the walls have to be reframed and that's an additional cost. You can also have existing sheetrock coated--that's a bit cheaper. I had that done in one room after wasting 5 days removing old paper wallpaper that destroyed the walls. The only reason I can think of to resheetrock rather than coat is when there isn't sheetrock there--like I took out the old ceiling and vaulted the room into the attic.
    Thank you. I know that my current walls/ceiling are plaster. I pulled down a drop acoustic tile ceiling and found a lot of cracks. The walls are paneled with some kind of 70s fake wood paneling and so I suspect I will find the same issue (cracks) in the wall plaster. I was thinking that just replacing it all with sheetrock would be the easiest but that may not be the case. Maybe there are other options.

 

 

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