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  1. #1
    kristen9 is offline Junior Member
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    Default winter-proof old windows

    Anyone have any recommendations for “aesthetically appealing” ways to winter-poof old home windows? I have a storm window, however, the windows are still very thin and cold air is coming through.

  2. #2
    BeckyJ's Avatar
    BeckyJ is offline Professor Ornery
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    I have used that plastic film you can get at HD with good results. You tape it on (tape comes with) and go over it with a blow dryer to seal. I would assume that a more permanent method would involve replacing the windows.....
    Remember, no matter where you go, there you are. -- B. Banzai

  3. #3
    OldMama is offline Senior Member
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    Ditto what Becky said. Before I replaced my windows I used the plastic film kits. They may not be as visually appealing as you like but they do work.

  4. #4
    stock's Avatar
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    Interior storm windows like these
    Chris
    Philadelphia Salvage
    Design Build

    542 Carpenter Lane - Retail and Custom
    2234 W. Westmoreland "The Foundry"

    "Anyone who would trade their freedom for safety
    deserves neither freedom or safety."

    - Benjamin Franklin

  5. #5
    kimlet is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by stock View Post
    Interior storm windows like these
    Have you had any experience with these? I was considering getting some interior storm windows and wasn't sure if they actually worked. Someone else also recommended Innerglass interior storm windows (Measure). Any thoughts on these?

  6. #6
    stock's Avatar
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    Kimlet,

    I like the magnet ones because there is no drilling, tabs etc... and when spring comes, you can pull the window off easily with the magnet system. The magnet strip can be painted after it's installed, you don't even see it.
    Chris
    Philadelphia Salvage
    Design Build

    542 Carpenter Lane - Retail and Custom
    2234 W. Westmoreland "The Foundry"

    "Anyone who would trade their freedom for safety
    deserves neither freedom or safety."

    - Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
    restore is offline Junior Member
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    You can fairly easily build your own interior storm windows out of 1/8" thick polycarbonate or acrylic sheeting and some CRL storm window framing. They really make a HUGE difference, and they are hardly noticeable once they are installed, especially if you have white woodwork. My bedroom has 6 big old original windows, that are in great shape, but were incredibly leaky. After I built and installed the interior storms, there is no air leakage around the windows and the room went from being on of the coldest in the house to the warmest.

    I recommend using polycarbonate sheets rather than acrylic, even though it costs a little more, it won't yellow over the years and it's a lot stronger. I've built 10 of these for my old windows so far and I plan to make more. Check out the links below for the products I used (you can buy polycarbonate sheets locally to avoid shipping costs, but in my case I ordered in bulk so it was cheaper even with the shipping).

    CRL-Sash White Universal Storm Window Frame | BS1W

    Polycarbonate Sheet, 1/8" Thick

  8. #8
    redpinstripes is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by stock View Post
    Kimlet,

    I like the magnet ones because there is no drilling, tabs etc... and when spring comes, you can pull the window off easily with the magnet system. The magnet strip can be painted after it's installed, you don't even see it.
    Chris, the ones you link to seem to be adhesive-based rather than magnetic. Am I missing something?

  9. #9
    stock's Avatar
    stock is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by redpinstripes View Post
    Chris, the ones you link to seem to be adhesive-based rather than magnetic. Am I missing something?
    Here is another link, same site, showing the magnets. So the metal strip is stuck/glued to the original window frame, that is true. You can paint over it once to blend it in. It stays there year round, but after painted, you don't really even see it. The magnet part is then stuck to the glass/plexi part. You put the glass with the magnets up to the metal that is around your window and they pull each other together. Done.

    BTW, I'm not endorising this particular company, just the idea. I think I did my my stuff from them though, but it's been a while and I can't remember.
    Chris
    Philadelphia Salvage
    Design Build

    542 Carpenter Lane - Retail and Custom
    2234 W. Westmoreland "The Foundry"

    "Anyone who would trade their freedom for safety
    deserves neither freedom or safety."

    - Benjamin Franklin

  10. #10
    kimlet is offline Member
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    Thanks for the suggestions! We have old leaded glass windows, some with diamond grill patterns, so I don't really want to replace them but I can feel wind blowing on me while I sit in my living room so something needs to be done!! Now, does anyone have any recommendations for a handyman who can do the measuring, installing, etc.???

  11. #11
    Braveheart is offline Mismember
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimlet View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions! We have old leaded glass windows, some with diamond grill patterns, so I don't really want to replace them but I can feel wind blowing on me while I sit in my living room so something needs to be done!! Now, does anyone have any recommendations for a handyman who can do the measuring, installing, etc.???
    Check out my post for magnetic storm channel under classified. It won't last long as it's premium material.

  12. #12
    gren's Avatar
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    My solution has been to push one rod with a thick curtain close to the window preventing most air from leaving and then have my normal aesthetically appealing curtain in front which is larger than the window. For my old sliding glass door I used a packing blanket. And it all looks good if you cover it with a nicer curtain. It made the basement feel 10 degrees warmer without raising the thermostat.

  13. #13
    catmom3's Avatar
    catmom3 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimlet View Post
    Have you had any experience with these? I was considering getting some interior storm windows and wasn't sure if they actually worked. Someone else also recommended Innerglass interior storm windows (Measure). Any thoughts on these?
    I have something similar that I got when I had new windows put in because I couldn't get double-paned windows (thanks to Historic Commission regulations, don't get me started). Anyway, I think these are an improvement over plastic which I tried before I had the new windows. I do the curtain-against-the-window bit for rooms that aren't used as often, and I also have an insulated curtain in a drafty interior doorway. I used a tension rod there instead of putting up hardware.

  14. #14
    catmom3's Avatar
    catmom3 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimlet View Post
    Have you had any experience with these? I was considering getting some interior storm windows and wasn't sure if they actually worked. Someone else also recommended Innerglass interior storm windows (Measure). Any thoughts on these?
    Quote Originally Posted by kimlet View Post
    Have you had any experience with these? I was considering getting some interior storm windows and wasn't sure if they actually worked. Someone else also recommended Innerglass interior storm windows (Measure). Any thoughts on these?
    I have something similar that I got when I had new windows put in because I couldn't get double-paned windows (thanks to Historic Commission regulations, don't get me started). Anyway, I think these are an improvement over plastic which I tried before I had the new windows. I do the curtain-against-the-window bit for rooms that aren't used as often, and I also have an insulated curtain in a drafty interior doorway. I used a tension rod there instead of putting up hardware.

 

 

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