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  1. #1
    Moonraker is offline Rocket Scientist
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    Default An Indian on a 100' pole at 5th & York, today being near Callowhill to Vine.

    I have been requested to research a statue.

    Once upon a time near 5th & York Road, being the area near Callowhill & Vine Street, the stood a statue of an Indian on 100' pole, which was on an approximate 16" ball, material is unknown. This was a commemoration to the last Pennsylvania Indian Pow-Wow of Indian peoples, and was rumored to have been a weathervane. It was raised in the early 1800's and lasted until the 1920's.

    Persons having information are asked to contact me.

  2. #2
    ZARK's Avatar
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    Wow, I never heard of this before. Could be interesting. Oh incidently, 5th and York would be at the area of Spring Garden st. 4th and York would be just north of Vine.

  3. #3
    Colin P. Varga is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonraker View Post
    I have been requested to research a statue.

    Once upon a time near 5th & York Road, being the area near Callowhill & Vine Street, the stood a statue of an Indian on 100' pole, which was on an approximate 16" ball, material is unknown. This was a commemoration to the last Pennsylvania Indian Pow-Wow of Indian peoples, and was rumored to have been a weathervane. It was raised in the early 1800's and lasted until the 1920's.

    Persons having information are asked to contact me.
    It seems to me something standing 100 ft. above the street in that area at that time would have stood above or at least the same height as most of the buildings there and probably would be in any photos taken from a roof top of the area. If it was a 100 ft. weathervane on top of a building it would seem that people would have written folk songs about it. For a statue to last that long it would have needed to be made of something other than tin or wood.
    Goodnight Rossana Arquette whereever you are.

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    It is mentioned in the writings of Christopher Morley.
    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

  5. #5
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    I have zero additional info about the statue, but your description sounds really cool. I'll keep my eyes peeled.

  6. #6
    Moonraker is offline Rocket Scientist
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    Default It is mentioned in the writings of Christopher Morley

    Chiosso is correct, that fact was mentioned the last time the requestor repeated themselves. How is it listed by Morley? Another factoid was that the name of the Chief began with the letter T.

  7. #7
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    Default Indian pole

    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

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    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

  9. #9
    Colin P. Varga is offline Senior Member
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    I would guess the figure would be Tamenend. Tamenend societies were popular at the end of the 18th cen. and the beginning of the 19th. A curious detail in the narrative is that stage coaches left from the Pole to NYC - home of Tammany Hall. It could be completely unrelated or an easy way for people to remember where to catch the stage coach.
    Goodnight Rossana Arquette whereever you are.

  10. #10
    Colin P. Varga is offline Senior Member
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    "I'd also like to see the Indian Pole restored on the corner of York and 4th Sts. It was the place (once outside of town) where the Lenape gathered for meetings. It was a tall pole with a flat metal likeness of Tamanend on top."


    philebrity.com » Blog Archive » Happy St. Tammany’s Day!

    Maybe this guy knows something.
    Goodnight Rossana Arquette whereever you are.

  11. #11
    Sean is offline Senior Member
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    Reading what Chiosso quoted makes me think wandering is a lost art, over taken by the internet. I've found myself hunting for facts similar to how Christopher Morley was, but using google and wikipedia instead of a tabacconist.

  12. #12
    Moonraker is offline Rocket Scientist
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    Default York Road & The Journey of a Thousand Miles..................

    I just spent 11 days in Lviv, Khrakov & Budapest, sometimes hitting the streets at 3-5 a.m. and taking a quick cat-nap until the tour bus left at 9:00.
    It reminded me of my first NYC experience, walking Canal Street starting in the Bowery and ending up at Times Square. Lesson Learned: Egg Cream. I will be glad give you a short lesson on wandering.

    As noted on the maps and article, that was the terminus of York Road. I often wondered way York Road meandered into Bucks County around New Hope, so far from the obvious route, which today is US Route 1.
    Last edited by Moonraker; 06-13-2012 at 12:33 PM.

  13. #13
    CHIOSSO's Avatar
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    Philadelphia to Willow Grove
    Via Old York Pike
    Our Cycle Route No. 6
    (1897-98 series)

    The bicycle meet to be held at Willow Grove on the 29th inst. suggests the present trip along the popular Old York Road – “road” or “pike,” as you like; we don’t seem to be all agreed on that point since its modern improvement. As to its first title “Old,” no one cares to deny it, not so much because it was first ordered to be laid out 'way back in 1693 as because it was the original highway between our city and New York. In the course of time a shorter road Gothamward via Frankford and Bristol, was “rung in” as new, and this one was “rung out” as old, and as such it has since remained. It was ever thus!

    If ever you walked or rode up Fourth street from Market street, and passed by St. George’s Church, with the date 1763 on its memorial tablet and crossed Vine street, you must have noticed a bifurcation at the angle of which stands a huge flagpole; at its foot, a small fountain, around which street urchins “mostly congregate,” on its top the figure of an Indian used as a weather-vane.

    That is the spot where the Old York Road branched off from Fourth street. That bed of most unlovely cobble stones unofficially labeled “York avenue,” on the left of the pole, is the modern representative of the former highway.


    Thence it joined the Germantown road at (what is now) Green street, and struck out for itself northward at the intersection of Rising Sun lane with the present Twelfth street, where it now practically begins for us moderners.

    We may strike it here from North Broad street, the intervening section of Rising Sun lane being now asphalted; or we may enjoy the asphalt of Broad street as far as it goes at the present date, and then, picking our way across the vacant lots on our right for the distance of one block, reach the pike near the extremity of Hunting Park.

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    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

  14. #14
    ZARK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin P. Varga View Post
    "I'd also like to see the Indian Pole restored on the corner of York and 4th Sts. It was the place (once outside of town) where the Lenape gathered for meetings. It was a tall pole with a flat metal likeness of Tamanend on top."


    philebrity.com » Blog Archive » Happy St. Tammany’s Day!

    Maybe this guy knows something.
    Also note: That Buttonwood street, from 2nd to York was originally call Tammany st.

  15. #15
    CHIOSSO's Avatar
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    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

  16. #16
    CHIOSSO's Avatar
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    Uncovering the history of a St. Tammany weathervane | Artful Science

    The St. Tammany motif features an Indian chief holding a bow and arrow and standing on the shaft of another arrow. He’s believed to represent a 17th century chief in the Lenni-Lenape tribe in the Delaware Valley, known alternatively as Tammany, Tamanend, or Tammamend. Because of his role in establishing peace between Native Americans and the English settlers in the Pennsylvania colony, he achieved near-mythic status, and his name was co-opted by various Societies of St. Tammany, the most famous of which grew into the Tammany Hall political machine.
    The St. Tammany motif features an Indian chief holding a bow and arrow and standing on the shaft of another arrow. He’s believed to represent a 17th century chief in the Lenni-Lenape tribe in the Delaware Valley, known alternatively as Tammany, Tamanend, or Tammamend. Because of his role in establishing peace between Native Americans and the English settlers in the Pennsylvania colony, he achieved near-mythic status, and his name was co-opted by various Societies of St. Tammany, the most famous of which grew into the Tammany Hall political machine.

    The largest and most famous St. Tammany weathervane—standing more than eight feet tall—is at the American Folk Art Museum in New York City. The one that Payne de Chavez repaired is only one-third the size, nearly three feet tall.



    Moyamensing became known for its penitentiary, violent hose company, cemeteries, wretchedly poor inhabitants, and crime. Harry C. Silcox

  17. #17
    Colin P. Varga is offline Senior Member
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    I think HSP might have a weathervane like that one.
    Goodnight Rossana Arquette whereever you are.

  18. #18
    Phillyxpat is offline Senior Member
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    File:Weathervane - American Folk Art Museum, NYC - IMG 5871.JPG - Wikimedia Commons

    Antiques and the Arts Online -

    A popular design no doubt. Indian in first link maybe made in NYC (second link). Will be interesting to see what made in Phila model looks like.

    This is a great thread. Thx to you all for your research on this very interesting piece of Philly history.

  19. #19
    harryk is offline Junior Member
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    See Indian Pole, Northern Liberties, Native American, Old York Road, Christopher Morley, Vine Street Expressway, King Tamane, for more about the Indian Pole, and my search for a photo of it. This all stems from research I'm doing for my book: Northern Liberties, Philadelphia: A Brief History. It's a follow up to Philadelphia's Lost Waterfront, published last year by the History Press.
    harryk

  20. #20
    ZARK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harryk View Post
    See Indian Pole, Northern Liberties, Native American, Old York Road, Christopher Morley, Vine Street Expressway, King Tamane, for more about the Indian Pole, and my search for a photo of it. This all stems from research I'm doing for my book: Northern Liberties, Philadelphia: A Brief History. It's a follow up to Philadelphia's Lost Waterfront, published last year by the History Press.
    harryk
    Thanks HarryK, this is really interesting..The puzzle is coming together slowly.

 

 

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