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  1. #121
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bainbridge View Post
    Another good one is using "gone" no matter what the tense.
    i.e. "where you gone?" or "she's gone to the store" or "i'm gone to atlantic city."

    For the record, I've always said "pash-yunk." My grandmother always said "Giraahhhd Avenue." Lots of people make fun of me for saying, "flahr-ist," not "floor-ist."

    The guy in the original video doesn't sound authentic whatsoever. The best impression of a Philly accent ever was Tina Fey on SNL when the Eagles were in the Superbowl. She did a Philly accent and Amy Poehler did a Boston accent and "fought" about who had the better football team. It was awesome.
    A floorist specializes in floors. A florist specializes in flowers.

  2. #122
    billy ross is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burholme06 View Post
    And this goes for most "or" words:

    Florida = Flarida
    Orange = Arange
    Oregon = Aregon
    Authority = Atharity
    Sometimes I'll get people to say "Horrible Florida oranges" just to hear how they say it. It's hit me recently that I say forehead as farhead, and that it's one of the few words which I don't pronounce according to how it's spelled.

  3. #123
    PortPennFerry is offline Senior Member
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    One underappreciated part of Philadelphianese is that lax 'i's' that would be slurred or even skipped when not stressed are quite stressed in Philly-
    "Let's get him"- Leht's geht heem
    "Pennypack"- never "Pennuhpack"

  4. #124
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    Reberson is offline Senior Member
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    Sundee, Mondee, Tuesdee, etc...

    Dough-nit - Doughnut
    Winda- Window

  5. #125
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    JasonMcElroy is online now Senior Member
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    Eeee-liggle. Things y'aint sposeta be doin'.

    Jason

  6. #126
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    Hospitalitygirl is offline Moderator
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    You do realize that some of you sound pretty bad, and in fact worse than some of us.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  7. #127
    RestlessLegs is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by guzzijason View Post
    hoagie (hay-oh-gie)
    no (nay-oh)

    It's the whole extra sylable thing that weirds me out. Ac-a-me? How do you figure?

    __Jason
    I spent a few hours with my four-year old niece last week. She asked me if I shop at the Ac-a-me! Was too cute. She lives in the suburbs. Of course, her parents both grew up in Philly. There is an Acme in Flourtown, so that is where they do their food shopping.

  8. #128
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    JasonMcElroy is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hospitalitygirl
    You do realize that some of you sound pretty bad, and in fact worse than some of us.
    Who is the "us" and who is the "them" in this claim?

    Jason

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonMcElroy View Post
    Who is the "us" and who is the "them" in this claim?

    Jason
    "us" = native born Philadelphians; "them" = not native born.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  10. #130
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    JasonMcElroy is online now Senior Member
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    Sometimes it takes an outsider's perspective to notice something in ourselves.

    In high school I was involved in musicals and chorus. Our vocal coach would constantly bitch to us about losing what she called the "ayoh" (tough to spell, but hopefully you know what I'm talking about) and the "wooder" sound. We were all dumbfounded and had no idea what she was talking about. We figured she was just crazy or something. How would we know, having never lived or spent significant time elsewhere? Having not the awareness (nor interest) of locale and pronunciation at that age.

    A couple years later at college . . .

    I INSTANTLY recognized all the people from the Philly area. Their pronunciation and vocabulary was so distinct. And to my ears at the time, not in a good way. I wondered if that's how I sounded to others. I guess I was a little embarrassed. I became self-conscious about it. Through no overt effort that I could discern at the time, I learned to lose it completely. For a number of reasons I wished to forget everything about my past and where I was from. That's one of the reasons I went to college so far from home.

    As an adult having grown into myself and having gained confidence and pride in who I am and where I've been, I would never try to hide or be ashamed of my origins. I've also come to be greatly interested in language and speech and the peculiarities it can offer.

    My friends in New York never had any idea I was from here until I'd come back from visiting for the weekend carrying a linguistic hangover that gave me away instantly.

    Having moved back here after all these years, the things Philadelphians say and the way they say them interests me more than ever. In an endearing way, not a critical one.

    I suspect HG was going to accuse me of being a transplant. . . then again it could just be Philly paranoia that lead me to believe so. ;-0

    Jason

  11. #131
    Hospitalitygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonMcElroy View Post
    Sometimes it takes an outsider's perspective to notice something in ourselves.

    In high school I was involved in musicals and chorus. Our vocal coach would constantly bitch to us about losing what she called the "ayoh" (tough to spell, but hopefully you know what I'm talking about) and the "wooder" sound. We were all dumbfounded and had no idea what she was talking about. We figured she was just crazy or something. How would we know, having never lived or spent significant time elsewhere? Having not the awareness (nor interest) of locale and pronunciation at that age.

    A couple years later at college . . .

    I INSTANTLY recognized all the people from the Philly area. Their pronunciation and vocabulary was so distinct. And to my ears at the time, not in a good way. I wondered if that's how I sounded to others. I guess I was a little embarrassed. I became self-conscious about it. Through no overt effort that I could discern at the time, I learned to lose it completely. For a number of reasons I wished to forget everything about my past and where I was from. That's one of the reasons I went to college so far from home.

    As an adult having grown into myself and having gained confidence and pride in who I am and where I've been, I would never try to hide or be ashamed of my origins. I've also come to be greatly interested in language and speech and the peculiarities it can offer.

    My friends in New York never had any idea I was from here until I'd come back from visiting for the weekend carrying a linguistic hangover that gave me away instantly.

    Having moved back here after all these years, the things Philadelphians say and the way they say them interests me more than ever. In an endearing way, not a critical one.

    I suspect HG was going to accuse me of being a transplant. . . then again it could just be Philly paranoia that lead me to believe so. ;-0

    Jason


    I am first generation born, so I don't actually have a "true Philadelphia accent" either. I have been told by more than one person that I speak with a slight accent. The nuns in school taught us to pronounce f-o-r-e-h-e-a-d as "far-id", and to make certain we pronounced the "r" in library and February. When I speak, most people aren't quite certain where I am from.

    It is possible to detect the variations on the accent from neighborhood to neighborhood and the surrounding townships. Some are more annoying than others. But I have a collection of friends from around the country, and you can't really say that some regional dialects are better than ours. Some, are in fact, as grating as fingernails on a chalkboard
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  12. #132
    Sycamore is offline Sure Shot
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    I grew up in Delaware County. I never considered myself to have a Philadelphia accent, and could definitely identify it in some native Philadelphians. However, when I moved to Vermont, more than one person pegged me as being from Philadelphia by my accent alone.

  13. #133
    roxyfoxy is offline Senior Member
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    I'm a lifelong Philadelphian, and I've still never heard anybody say "nay-oh" for "no" and "hay oh gie" for "hoagie".
    She understood history, memory, record.
    And I will not forget her, a common housewife, who rose above her nature.

  14. #134
    Longboat is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hospitalitygirl View Post


    I am first generation born, so I don't actually have a "true Philadelphia accent" either. I have been told by more than one person that I speak with a slight accent. The nuns in school taught us to pronounce f-o-r-e-h-e-a-d as "far-id", and to make certain we pronounced the "r" in library and February. When I speak, most people aren't quite certain where I am from.
    If you pronounce the first "r" in February, then you truly have a very strange accent! How about the "t" in often?


    It is possible to detect the variations on the accent from neighborhood to neighborhood and the surrounding townships. Some are more annoying than others. But I have a collection of friends from around the country, and you can't really say that some regional dialects are better than ours. Some, are in fact, as grating as fingernails on a chalkboard
    Oh, don't get me started on Boston!

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longboat View Post
    If you pronounce the first "r" in February, then you truly have a very strange accent! How about the "t" in often?




    Oh, don't get me started on Boston!
    Nuns taught us to pronounce it as "off-en". I pronounce the t very softly if at all.
    I am not the Jackass Whisperer.

  16. #136
    changeisgood is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxyfoxy View Post
    I'm a lifelong Philadelphian, and I've still never heard anybody say "nay-oh" for "no" and "hay oh gie" for "hoagie".
    I am not from Philadelphia and it took me a while to try to replicate what hay oh gie really sounded like, I couldn't imagine it, but then it dawned on me, and so many people say it. They don't enunciate each syllable, which I thought due to the way they separated each syllable out, but its all one syllable. For us non natives we imagine HO GEE, I think HOWWWW GEE is how I usually hear it, and it may seem not that different but for the untrained ear, it is difficult to understand.

    I think NYOW is better than nay-oh but either way, if you are expecting NO and get a version of NYOWW, it is not always evident

    I heard a teacher teaching a lesson on the long O sound, she had the class reciting no, go, show, blow, and really enunciating each long O vowel sound, then at the end she screamed at one her students, NYOWW you can't GOWWW to the bathroom, *cue the teacher bashing, extra points for Philadelphia bashing
    On va se demerder, peut-être!
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  17. #137
    Burholme06 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxyfoxy View Post
    I'm a lifelong Philadelphian, and I've still never heard anybody say "nay-oh" for "no" and "hay oh gie" for "hoagie".
    You don’t hear it because it’s what you know. There is a term (can’t think of it) for one’s inability to hear their own accent. Open your mouth in the Midwest and watch the funny look you get when say “home” or “ferry” or “coffee” or “error”.

  18. #138
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    guzzijason is offline Mostly Human
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxyfoxy View Post
    I'm a lifelong Philadelphian, and I've still never heard anybody say "nay-oh" for "no" and "hay oh gie" for "hoagie".
    I'd bet dollars to donuts that this is how you pronounce it though! You don't *try* to pronnounce it that way, and you don't hear it that way, but nonetheless, its in your circuitry. It's only really apparent to someone who hasen't heard it or spoken it that way their entire life (like me).

    __Jason

  19. #139
    Winston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gen 3 Electric View Post
    Ok, I caught myself this morning using my Philly accent. I was leading out team training meeting. I was making a reference to my technicians and referred to them as "youes Guys". I use it as an opportunity to make a funny. My Techs were quick to have a laugh at my expense.

    The Philly in me wants “you” to have a plural like in old English. It’s just classy?
    On a related note, I used to hear "mine" pluralized ("those are yours, these are mines"). Not so much these days, but growing up in NE Philly in the 80s that was pretty common (among my friends at least).

    I get zinged for pronouncing "bagel" as "beggle" — which is strange, because the Philly dialect should make it "baiyyygle", shouldn't it? I'll have an aiyyg baiyygle sounds more natural than aiyyg beggle. Any advice? I want to make sure I'm mispronouncing it correctly.

  20. #140
    Dayman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by winston View Post
    on a related note, i used to hear "mine" pluralized ("those are yours, these are mines"). Not so much these days, but growing up in ne philly in the 80s that was pretty common (among my friends at least).
    those are mines precious
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