Register
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 43
  1. #21
    thoth's Avatar
    thoth is offline I LOOK LIKE THIS
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cedar Park
    Posts
    4,531

    Default

    What's the cutoff date for filing if they extended?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArcticSplash View Post
    That nobody will really know unless the finances are audited.

    With Germantown Settlement, Philadelphia Magazine had a small bevy of fired accountants to interview, plus Blondell (Settlement's primary cheerleader in City Hall), plus Settlement had to disclose their current picture before U.S. Federal Bankruptcy Court. The story couldn't get out about how it imploded until their court filings were available.

    One thing is clear, they are growing very quickly and from their tax return it's not due to PFHA mortgages and rental income.


    Their '09 return showed a significant drop in payroll they went from a profit to a loss in that year. Did they right the ship in '10? I cannot tell because their last return is not yet on GuideStar.

  2. #22
    thoth's Avatar
    thoth is offline I LOOK LIKE THIS
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cedar Park
    Posts
    4,531

    Default

    Pat has many faults, but not being puerto rican is not among them. You can't really say what is or is not a hispanic name, any more than you could say what is or isn't an american name. Don't forget that a good portion of immigrants to PR came from Corsica and mainland Italy. Two of my closest friends in Argentina had the surnames Flichmann and Galleano. They were assuredly hispanic, in spite of having german and italian ancestors.

    Quote Originally Posted by eldondre View Post
    dicarlo certainly isnt a hispanic name. as with most groups the emphasis is in poor and less on puerto rican not everyone in the new affordable housing developments is puerto rican. she is very hostile to.new development. same lady who had a bank knocked down despite an offer to.renovate it. prior to nutter these organizations had money funneled to them to acquire property. freeland had fumo funnel money to her via the waterfront corp....not sure who supports dicarlo. ive heard that sanchez (a norris sq resident) doesnt really support her. this is a big problem in the city whether it be a civic, a cdc, or a church. that said the sq really needa to drop the methadone clinic

  3. #23
    ArcticSplash's Avatar
    ArcticSplash is offline Dixie Normus
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Couch Surfing in Kensington
    Posts
    11,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thoth View Post
    What's the cutoff date for filing if they extended?
    September 15th, 2011 for their FY09-10 taxes.

    You can always file a Form 8868 to buy you 3 months, and you can file a 2nd one to give you 6 months. Same form you use for your personal taxes if you can't get them done on time.

  4. #24
    thoth's Avatar
    thoth is offline I LOOK LIKE THIS
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cedar Park
    Posts
    4,531

    Default

    So they should have filed yesterday, correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArcticSplash View Post
    September 15th, 2011 for their FY09-10 taxes.

    You can always file a Form 8868 to buy you 3 months, and you can file a 2nd one to give you 6 months. Same form you use for your personal taxes if you can't get them done on time.

  5. #25
    ArcticSplash's Avatar
    ArcticSplash is offline Dixie Normus
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Couch Surfing in Kensington
    Posts
    11,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thoth View Post
    So they should have filed yesterday, correct?
    Their normal tax due date (from how I calculate it based on their fiscal year) is Mar 15th. That would be for FY2011 as of yesterday.


    What I am complaining about is the year prior to that... FY2010--which isn't on GuideStar. You can get 2 extensions on your 990 return, each for 3 months for a total of a 6 month extension. It's always wise to assume that any taxpayer you're looking at is going to use up both extensions. On for-profits and individuals who normally owe every year, it's a fairly significantly high number who do.


    So FY2010 should have been filed Mar 15 of last year... and if they got extensions, then September 15 2011. Assuming a 6 month processing window for GuideStar to pick up the IRS data and that means the return for FY2010 should be on GuideStar well by now, which it isn't.


    I have already filed an IRS Form 13909 form complaining about this and faxed it to their Dallas office who handles non-profit investigations.

  6. #26
    thoth's Avatar
    thoth is offline I LOOK LIKE THIS
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cedar Park
    Posts
    4,531

    Default

    Kudos, keep us informed.

  7. #27
    BALLZ2BHERE's Avatar
    BALLZ2BHERE is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kensington
    Posts
    210

    Default

    any update on the tax filings yet today puts us in a new fiscal year

  8. #28
    InYourVacancies is offline Blight Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SWCC
    Posts
    185

    Default

    R.I.P.

  9. #29
    BALLZ2BHERE's Avatar
    BALLZ2BHERE is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kensington
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Wow that is just insulting to the mind and soul...

  10. #30
    Nytecat is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I know it's impossible to save every gorgeous church building in the city but it's still painful to watch them go.

  11. #31
    BALLZ2BHERE's Avatar
    BALLZ2BHERE is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kensington
    Posts
    210

    Default

    if the owners of this church where even half as aggressive about saving this church as they are about defending the proposed project they have this thread would not even exist.
    do the math 7 ml to restore -14ml 10 houses something just dont add up !

  12. #32
    thesomersteam's Avatar
    thesomersteam is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    295

    Default

    This is an extremely informative and unfortunately depressing thread. Thanks for the information. Does anyone have a rendering what is being proposed there? Am curious who is behind the NSCA (president, vice-president) ? Or is the power political with the Council Woman Sanchez ? There are so few real estate sales in this area (north of Berks St) but that is something that can certainly change in the future if the NSCA does some positive things to help improve the area and the community.

    ~ Chris
    TheSomersTeamBlog

  13. #33
    ajs8905 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nytecat View Post
    I know it's impossible to save every gorgeous church building in the city but it's still painful to watch them go.
    Actually, the most painful part is that it IS possible to save every historically/architecturally church in the city. Most other major US cities would be able to... Unfortunately, it just goes to show that Philly has not yet reached it's full potential as a mature and revitalized city. While I completely abhore any kind of Negadelphian sentiment, I must admit that the demolition of St. Boniface is not only an embarrassment to the city, but also perpetuates the negative stereotypes associated with Philly.

    A 140 year old Gothic church would never be demolished in Boston, New York or Chicago. The only city that might do such a thing would be... Detroit.

  14. #34
    Ptolemy's Avatar
    Ptolemy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Spruce Hill, University City, Philadelphia.
    Posts
    83

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juntonian View Post
    The demolition by neglect occurring throughout this city is painful and very difficult to endure. Only so many of these substantial edifices exist, built at the hands of master craftsmen whose artistry is lost using materials that can no longer be obtained. This is the architectural heritage that has been passed on to all of us collectively and it is being diminished irrevocably. St. Boniface and monumental churches like it constitute significant parts of the unique identity of our neighborhoods, yet thoughtless, shortsighted and ultimately disastrous policy decisions are causing the destruction of the physical fabric of those unique neighborhoods for which Philadelphians profess boundless pride.

    I understand that not every building can be preserved indefinitely, that cities are by nature impermanent and evolving. Yet the blocks surrounding Norris Square contain an abundance of empty lots perfectly suited to the construction of architecturally insignificant dwellings. Why not develop those properties?

    Churches tend to die slowly, often losing their congregations as the fortunes of the particular neighborhoods in which they are located go south, then losing their spires and various ornaments, and finally reaching a point at which they are beyond preservation due to decades of deferred maintenance. Every story I read about the imminent demise of another significant church property reminds me of the sad final chapter of the former Patterson Memorial Presbyterian Church designed by T.P. Chandler at 63rd and Vine. Its congregation could no longer afford to maintain it, the city attempted to find a way to save it but eventually it fell to the wrecking ball. What replaced it? A Walgreens. That is not the necessary and productive process of evolution of a healthy city. It's regression.
    This is one of the most articulate posts I read in a long time.

    An eloquent plea to make an effort to save the architectural heritage of our city.

  15. #35
    Debbie1125's Avatar
    Debbie1125 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,176

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ajs8905 View Post
    Actually, the most painful part is that it IS possible to save every historically/architecturally church in the city. Most other major US cities would be able to... Unfortunately, it just goes to show that Philly has not yet reached it's full potential as a mature and revitalized city. While I completely abhore any kind of Negadelphian sentiment, I must admit that the demolition of St. Boniface is not only an embarrassment to the city, but also perpetuates the negative stereotypes associated with Philly.

    A 140 year old Gothic church would never be demolished in Boston, New York or Chicago. The only city that might do such a thing would be... Detroit.
    In fact Philly's downtown pales in comparison to Boston. I was very impressed with Boston when I visited there last month. It reminds me very much of a European city. They mix in the old with the new. The beautiful building formerly occupied by Filene's is still there, as are other magnificent older structures. On the other hand, certain parts of downtown Philly are wastelands of surface parking lots.

    It saddens me to see St. Bonnie's torn down. I can barely look at the picture. Those homes surrounding Norris Square and the park itself were nice places back in the day. It's a shame that the residents living there now don't give a damn.

  16. #36
    ArcticSplash's Avatar
    ArcticSplash is offline Dixie Normus
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Couch Surfing in Kensington
    Posts
    11,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thesomersteam View Post
    This is an extremely informative and unfortunately depressing thread. Thanks for the information. Does anyone have a rendering what is being proposed there? Am curious who is behind the NSCA (president, vice-president) ? Or is the power political with the Council Woman Sanchez ? There are so few real estate sales in this area (north of Berks St) but that is something that can certainly change in the future if the NSCA does some positive things to help improve the area and the community.

    ~ Chris
    TheSomersTeamBlog
    After a LOT of bitching directed squarely at NSCA by myself and others, Norris Square wised up and put their drawings online:
    St. Boniface Redevelopment Project

    I can't believe they're dumping $5MM of NSP2 money along with matching funds for a total of $10M onto this one structure, on one block.

    They could have just used the $5MM of NSP2 funds to fill in almost every vacant lot on the first two streets west of Front Street with more low-income housing than what this project offers.

  17. #37
    NickFromGtown is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Germantown
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ajs8905 View Post
    Actually, the most painful part is that it IS possible to save every historically/architecturally church in the city. Most other major US cities would be able to... Unfortunately, it just goes to show that Philly has not yet reached it's full potential as a mature and revitalized city. While I completely abhore any kind of Negadelphian sentiment, I must admit that the demolition of St. Boniface is not only an embarrassment to the city, but also perpetuates the negative stereotypes associated with Philly.

    A 140 year old Gothic church would never be demolished in Boston, New York or Chicago. The only city that might do such a thing would be... Detroit.
    You're right. New York would NEVER do this sort of thing.

    Pennsylvania Station (New York City) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Oh, wait.

    I have to say though that the story of St. Boniface is rather disappointing. It's a pretty classic example of people not knowing what's best for them.

  18. #38
    ajs8905 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NickFromGtown View Post
    You're right. New York would NEVER do this sort of thing.

    Pennsylvania Station (New York City) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Oh, wait.

    I have to say though that the story of St. Boniface is rather disappointing. It's a pretty classic example of people not knowing what's best for them.
    Oh, wait. Penn Station was demolished in 1963! Long before most preservation ordinances and organizations were created.

    My point is that compared to most cities, Philadelphia's preservation programs are severely underfunded.

  19. #39
    the mule's Avatar
    the mule is offline Tumescent Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,096

    Default

    There's a lot you can blame the city for, but I don't think one of them is the lack of preservation of religious places of worship.

    Nothing short of eminent domain here would have saved that building, and the city would have had to demonstrate some public benefit for taking the church and spending money to repair it itself. That is not something the should do, and thankfully it doesn't do that. Historical designation has no teeth because it doesn't magically produce funding to restore the building.

    Perhaps that $7 million number thrown around here before could have preserved it... as a religious place of worship. Not an acceptable use of public funds. And let's not kid ourselves, it would not be an income generating tourist destination either. Adaptive reuse as housing would easily cost more then 3 times that, would involve removing the interior anyway, and would require owners capable of assembling the financing and making it a viable project.

    It's easy to say that something should be done, but actually making it happen is a different story.

    With that said, the fact that $5 million in NSP funds are being dumped there for such a low impact project is disgusting.

  20. #40
    ArcticSplash's Avatar
    ArcticSplash is offline Dixie Normus
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Couch Surfing in Kensington
    Posts
    11,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by the mule View Post

    With that said, the fact that $5 million in NSP funds are being dumped there for such a low impact project is disgusting.
    It's actually $10 million. Pat's using the NSP2 money to get a state matching grant to bloat it up to $10MM. That's why she's wants to build a palace on the Bonafice block, and she's told the residents they will get all these goodies with those funds.

    The way Pat's open community input goes is kinda like this: the residents don't get asked WHETHER you are for a project, but "what color do you want the project?" Questioning viability is absolutely out of the question. That's where the divide is between NSCA employees and tenants, and non-NSCA who live in Norris Square. That's why I compare NSCA to PHA.


    The only way to get NSCA to explain the viability of its projects and to seek REAL input from the whole community is to question the very existence of NSCA itself. And it seems to be working, because before these public meetings and the remapping, NSCA kept its cards close to itself and it didn't put the Bonafice plans and renderings up on its site.

    Pat already got a warning shot from me. I sent her a copy of the certified letter I sent to the ZBA and to WCRP asking for a continuance on the Front & Norris project. I'm sorry but even if your project is going up on the west side of Front Street under the EL does NOT mean you can go to zoning without soliciting input from the opposite side of Front Street.

    Pat used to hold the Pennsy switch yard which is now Kensington CAPA high school. And to add insult to injury, she squeezed several million out of the public developer who built Kensington CAPA, when she was given public money in the first place to buy up the rail yard. Think about it for a second: a non-profit juiced with public monies, extorting a higher price for a real-estate transaction from a developer... being paid with public funds.

    It's like PHA playing hard ball to get money out of SDP.

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2